New federal ruling on voter ID resonates in North Carolina

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

Voter ID laws in North Carolina, Texas and other states appear more vulnerable to legal challenges after a federal judge struck down a Wisconsin law that required voters show a state issued photo ID at the polls.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman ruled the Wisconsin law places an unfair burden on poor and minority voters. The ruling could encourge opponents in North Carolina and other states to make similar challenges.

North Carolina and dozens more states require voters to show some form of identification when voting, according to The Associated Press. Legislation is being proposed in many others. The laws’ opponents, including many Democrats, argue the Republican-supported laws are an effort to suppress minority voters. Republicans who support the laws argue requiring a photo ID protects against voter fraud.

The North Carolina ID law was signed in August, two months after the Supreme Court struck down parts of the Voting Rights Act that required jurisdictions with a history of discrimination, many of them in the South, to seek federal approval before changing voter laws.

The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the Tarheel state the following month claiming North Carolina legislators “intentionally” discriminated against minorities. McCrory, who said the law protects against fraud, has said the lawsuit is “without merit.” He cited a video showing the president presenting an ID card to vote in Chicago.

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - This July 24, 2014, file photo shows Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Barack Obama’s request for billions of dollars to deal with tens of thousands of migrant children streaming across the border set off Democrats and Republicans. Lawmakers in both parties complained that the White House, six years in, still doesn’t get it when it comes to working with Congress.

    Lawmakers complain Obama too aloof with Congress

    President Barack Obama's request for billions of dollars to deal with migrant children streaming across the border set off Democrats and Republicans. Lawmakers in both parties complained that the White House — six years in — still doesn't get it when it comes to working with Congress.

  • Penn State hires former Cal AD to lead program

    Penn State has hired Sandy Barbour as athletic director, a month after she stepped down as AD at the University of California-Berkeley.

  •  
FILE - This May 20, 2014, file photo shows Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, Michelle Nunn in Atlanta as she speaks to her supporters after her primary win was announced at an election-night watch party.  Minutes after David Perdue won his Republican Senate primary in Georgia, a grainy image of  Nunn was on Atlanta TV as a faceless voice slammed her as a rubber stamp for President Barack Obama. In turn, Democrats portray Perdue as a greedy executive who laid off workers. It’s all a clear indicator of what the next three months hold for a first-time Democratic candidate who may be the party's only hope for picking off a GOP-held Senate seat in November.

    GOP works to avert Senate upset in Georgia

    Republicans are on the offensive in the opening days of Georgia's general election Senate campaign, hammering Democrat Michelle Nunn as a rubber stamp for President Barack Obama and questioning her resume as a non-profit executive — the very experience that anchors her appeal as a moderate who gets things done without partisan wrangling.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category