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“I had fled a dreadful Easter event and informed my friends they could meet me in a bar, then snagged a book in a local bookstore. What I found was In Love by Alfred Hayes: one of those man-tells-you-a-story-in-a-bar novels (love them), recounting an old lover and the effect of her decisions on their love affair, seeped in ’40s noir New York. You get a bastard child of Chandler and Colette, world-weary, lovesick and beautiful. To be read with an Old-Fashioned at hand.”

Andrew Sean Greer, author of The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells, now out in paperback

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 <span class="cutline_leadin">STONE MATTRESS: </span>Nine Tales. Margaret Atwood. Nan A. Talese. Doubleday. 288 pages. $25.95.

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    Past looms large in new stories from Margaret Atwood

    In Margaret Atwood’s new collection, the past looms large for aging protagonists, but sympathy and regret abound, too.

  • What are you reading now?

    “I just finished Claire DeWitt and The City of the Dead by Sara Gran, which I love, love, loved. It’s a mystery set in New Orleans shortly after the storm and solved by girl detective, Claire DeWitt, who applies her special method of detection which is pretty much based on yoga and Buddhism combined with the altered mind states of drugs, drink, dreams and growing up in Brooklyn.”

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 <span class="cutline_leadin">WHAT STAYS IN VEGAS:</span> The World of Personal Data — Lifeblood of Big Business C — and the End of Privacy as We Know It. Adam Tanner. PublicAffairs. 316 pages. $27.99.

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    ‘What Stays in Vegas’ examines data packaging and the end of privacy

    Journalist explains how data packaging makes American companies the biggest threat to privacy.

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