MacArthur Causeway Crash

Driver of Lamborghini in fatal crash on MacArthur Causeway in Miami Beach is charged

 
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crabin@MiamiHerald.com

The driver of a $400,000 Lamborghini Aventador that crashed into an SUV, killing one person, was speeding at 120 miles per hour, had bloodshot eyes and a strong smell of alcohol on him, police said.

Andres Esteban Toro, 53, was charged Friday with vehicular homicide, and Miami Beach police said a manslaughter charge is likely if toxicology reports come back positive.

“The defendant’s actions demonstrated a willful and wanton disregard for person and property,” Miami Beach police officers Kevin Millan and Michelle Sayegh wrote in their report.

A judge set Toro’s bond at $100,000 Friday morning, ordered his travel documents revoked and placed him under house arrest. Toro is in the hospital recovering, and didn’t appear in court. He will be formally charged in three weeks.

His attorney, Kendall Coffey, who called the accident “tragic,” unsuccessfully opposed the judge’s terms.

Asked about his client, Coffey only said, “Any discussion of legal issues is premature.”

Police and witnesses said Toro was streaking toward the mainland on the causeway just before 3 a.m., when the Lamborghini slammed into the back of a silver Chevrolet Suburban driven by Raul Alfonzo, which was stopped at a red light at the entrance to Palm Island.

The crash lifted the heavy SUV off the ground, and launched the Lamborghini into the air. It landed more than 100 yards away before it came to a stop.

Malcolm Lloyd, 42, a passenger in the Lamborghini, and highly-respected New York doctor and businessman, was killed immediately.

Alfonzo, 42, a personal trainer and bouncer, was listed in critical but stable condition at Jackson Memorial Hospital.

Sources familiar with the investigation said Toro and Lloyd were on their way to the mainland after spending time at the new hotel and club at the Versace Mansion on Ocean Drive.

Miami-Dade records indicate that Toro lives in a multimillion dollar Coconut Grove condo and works for a printing and graphics company. He has been charged with five moving violations the past three years, including failure to stop at a red light. Most of the charges were dismissed.

Friday morning, attorneys representing the Alfonzo family brought his wife and and two teenaged daughters to the firm’s Brickell office for a news conference. They held a picture of the smashed Chevrolet SUV and another picture of their hospitalized father with a neck brace.

“I don’t have a car. I don’t have nothing,” his wife Yinet Pacheco said between tears.

Raul Alfonzo was undergoing internal surgery as the family spoke, attorney Glen Z. Goldberg said.

“He looks all tough and scary, but he’s just a teddy bear,” said daughter Helen Alfonzo, 16. “It made me sad. How can someone be so reckless?”

The family said Raul Alfonzo, who also is a personal trainer, was on his way to the family’s Sweetwater home from a job working security at an Ocean Drive club.

Lloyd, who has a wife and two sons, lived in New York. After graduating from Johns Hopkins and getting a medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School, Lloyd began a successful company called Old Nassau Imports and sold a vodka brand he created called Double Cross Vodka. He has been featured in numerous lifestyle magazines over the years.

For his academic achievements and his business acumen, Lloyd has been affectionately referred to by friends and business associates as “Dr. Vodka.” Long after he finished his higher education, Lloyd remained a consultant at the bio-engineering school at Johns Hopkins, and created a company that funded student projects in medical engineering.

An Old Nassau company spokesman sent out a single paragraph statement Friday asking that “the privacy of his family and colleagues be respected.”

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