Terrorism

Federal judge waits for FBI in Sarasota Saudis case

 

Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Relatives of 9/11 victims are eagerly watching the legal struggle over information held by the FBI concerning a Saudi Arabian family in Sarasota that possibly had ties to terrorists, even as calls in Congress ramp up for more disclosure about how the attackers were funded.

On Friday, a federal judge in Fort Lauderdale is expected to receive FBI documents pertaining to the agency’s investigation of the Saudi family that abruptly left Sarasota just before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Late Thursday, the government asked for more time to submit the records, saying the materials that need to be searched comprise 23 boxes totaling 92,000 pages at the agency’s Tampa field office — some of documents carrying a “secret” classification.

Government lawyers proposed a May 2 deadline.

The judge had ordered the FBI to turn over the materials as part of a lawsuit by a South Florida news organization that has been joined by both the Herald-Tribune and the Miami Herald.

In his blistering 23-page order, the judge scolded the FBI for failing to conduct a comprehensive search initially for documents stemming from its investigation.

“Defendants’ eagerness to assert exemptions and wooden method of interpreting Plaintiffs’ [Freedom of Information Act] requests essentially deprives the Court of its role in examining any relevant documents and independently determining whether any exemptions may apply,” U.S. District Court Judge William Zloch in Fort Lauderdale wrote of the FBI, the defendant in the case.

Zloch ordered a more-exhaustive new search, with the resulting documents to be delivered — uncensored — to him for review Friday.

Additional documentation is due in June.

Members of the Saudi family have strongly denied any ties to the 9/11 terrorists.

If the judge eventually makes those documents public, the 16-month-old lawsuit could dovetail with a larger effort to shed more light on who financed the jet attacks on New York and Washington, D.C.

One effort is underway in New York federal court, where a 12-year-old case seeks $1 trillion in damages for the relatives of almost 10,000 9/11 victims.

In that case, families are attempting to sue the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and charities that it established.

In Congress, meanwhile, there is a growing drumbeat to make public a censored 28-page chapter about the terrorists’ financing that was pulled by unnamed government censors from the report, “Joint Inquiry Into Intelligence Activities Before and After the Terrorist Attacks of September 2001.” The joint Congressional report, minus the censored chapter, runs about 800 pages and was published in late 2002.

The classified section is believed by activists to be based on FBI and CIA documents, and to point fingers at Saudi Arabia, a long-time ally of the United States and key oil supplier.

“It all ties together about financing power, leading back to the Saudis,” said Bill Doyle, a retired stockbroker who lives in the Central Florida community of The Villages, and whose youngest son, Joseph, died after being trapped in New York’s World Trade Center.

Doyle is among the lead plaintiffs in one of three lawsuits against Saudi Arabia that have been combined into a single federal court action entitled “In Re: Terrorist Attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 (Saudi Arabia et al.)”

He said he believes the Sarasota connection — in which a Saudi family abruptly departed the United States two weeks before the attacks, leaving behind many possessions — could answer questions about larger issues.

“You take off a week or so before 9/11 and go back to Saudi Arabia and leave dirty diapers, food, two brand-new cars and a house. And there is also evidence that some of the people who were [taking flight] training over at Huffman Aviation in Venice were visiting their house,” Doyle said.

Supreme Court case

Meanwhile, the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to decide soon whether to hear arguments from the kingdom’s attorneys, who want their client removed as a defendant.

If successful, it would be the second time that those lawyers have persuaded a court to drop Saudi Arabia as a defendant.

In the first case, they argued that U.S. law does not allow suits against sovereign nations for damages. But a federal appeals court reversed that decision in December.

“We anticipate hearing from the Supreme Court in late June,” said Robert Haefele, an attorney who represents more than half of the 10,000 plaintiffs in the combined suits.

Sharon Premoli, co-chairwoman of activist group 9/11 Families United for Justice Against Terrorism, also is pushing for all FBI documents to be made public.

“The 28 pages are part and parcel of the FBI documents,” said Premoli, who survived the terror attacks and narrowly escaped from the World Trade Center’s north tower. “It is all one big cover-up.”

Doyle and Premoli’s efforts are in sync with those of retired U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, who co-chaired the joint congressional inquiry that published the 800-page report. The former Florida governor has battled for years to have the censored chapter about possible terror financing declassified.

Recently, a pair of congressmen also have called on President Barack Obama to declassify the censored pages, and wrote a form letter to other members of Congress urging them to review the missing chapter.

“The information contained in the redacted pages is critical to U.S. foreign policy moving forward and should thus be available to the American people,” said Rep. Walter Jones Jr., R-N.C.

Jones and Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., also have introduced a House resolution to declassify the 28 pages, which has drawn some bipartisan support.

Both had to go through a lengthy process to read the 28 pages, which are kept under tight security, and each was monitored by a federal agent making sure that notes were not taken and the pages were not copied or removed.

Obama publicly promised to make the chapter public, but has not done so.

“We have a burning question,” Premoli said. “We would like to know if President Obama has read the 28 pages.”

Training in Florida

What already is clear — and has been since shortly after the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — is that three of the 9/11 terrorists paid for flight training at Venice Airport.

Unclear is how they paid for that training and other activities.

The terror cell living in Sarasota County was one of a number scattered around the nation. Others are known to have existed in Los Angeles and San Diego, and in Falls Church, Va.

In the Freedom of Information Act lawsuit brought by BrowardBulldog.org of Fort Lauderdale — joined as “friends of the court” by the Herald-Tribune and the Miami Herald — the Justice Department acknowledged that it has tens of thousands of documents related to the Southwest Florida portion of its overall 9/11 investigation.

To date, Broward Bulldog and its media partners have received 35 heavily redacted pages.

In a 10th anniversary story by Broward Bulldog published in the Herald-Tribune and Miami Herald, the Fort Lauderdale news organization claimed that the terrorists who trained in Venice visited a home in the gated Prestancia community owned by Saudi businessman Esam Ghazzawi, who had close ties to the Saudi royal family.

For six years prior to 9/11, the home was occupied by Ghazzawi’s daughter, Anoud, and her husband, Abdulazziz al Hijji. “Phone records and the Prestancia gate records linked the house on Escondito Circle to the hijackers,” the Bulldog reported.

The FBI initially refused a Bulldog request to search for the family’s names in its archives, claiming that would amount to an invasion of privacy.

In his early April order, Judge Zloch described the FBI’s initial search as “preemptively narrowed in scope based on agency decisions that categories of documents are exempt, and thus, will not even be sought.”

Zloch then ordered the agency to use its most advanced document search system, and provided specific search terms — including the family’s names — that the FBI was required to use.

Zloch, appointed to the bench by Ronald Reagan and a former Notre Dame quarterback, also ordered the original, uncensored documents to be delivered to him for private review.

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