Restoring the Deering Estate wetlands

  • Jorge Jaramillo, right, and Bahram Charkhian, who work for the South Florida Water Management District, are project engineers who control the flow of water from the C-100 canal, one of the main arteries excavated years ago to help drain the Everglades. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Bahram Charkhian, who works for the South Florida Water Management District, works in Cutler Creek as part of a wetlands restoration project at Deering Estate. Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald staff

  • Jorge Jaramillo, right, and Bahram Charkhian, left, who work for the South Florida Water Management District, are working to restore wetlands at Deering Estate. Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald staff

  • John Thompson rides over the Chinese Bridge that Charles Deering built about 1916 over Cutler Creek, where scientists control the flow of water from the C-100 canal, one of the main arteries excavated years ago to help drain the Everglades. Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald staff

  • Housed in a cottage clad in coral rock, the command post for a massive coastal wetlands project that is an important step in restoring the waters of Biscayne Bay. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • This is Cutler Creek, where scientists, and engineer, control the flow of water from the C-100 canal, one of the main arteries excavated years ago to help drain the Everglades. In trying to undo the damage done, engineers are moving water under Old Cutler Road and down Cutler Creek, a creek that once rushed through the middle of the Deering Estate that for decades has run dry. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A line of dead upland trees and vegetation marks where water that started flowing down Cutler Creek two years ago is gradually creating a wetland habitat. South Florida Water Management District

  • These maps show the flow of water through the Everglades before canals were dredged in the 1940s to drain it, as it exists today, and what water managers hope it will look like when the $9.5 billion restoration project is complete. South Florida Water Management District