PolitiFact Florida

Rubio says increasing number of Americans want Obamacare repealed

 

PolitiFact Florida

The statement: "Americans increasingly want (the Affordable Care Act) to be repealed." Marco Rubio on Sunday, March 23, 2014 in a video to supporters.

The ruling: Experts say the percentage of voters who want Obamacare repealed is staying consistent within each poll.

We rate this claim: Mostly False.

Politifact Florida is a partnership between The Tampa Bay Times and The Miami Herald to check out truth in politics.


PolitiFact Florida

Many Republican legislators commemorated the fourth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act on March 23 by calling for its repeal.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., spoke out against the law in a video message to his supporters.

"We cannot give up," he said. "Obamacare is not something that’s set in stone. It can be repealed — and Americans increasingly want it to be repealed — and that’s what we’ll continue to do."

PolitiFact wanted to know if Rubio’s assessment of polling on the law is accurate. Do more and more people want the law repealed? We didn’t hear back from Rubio’s folks.

Many major pollsters include a question about repeal in their periodic surveys. Reports from the nonpartisan RealClearPolitics and the conservative American Enterprise Institute, both institutions that cover politics, don’t match up with Rubio’s claim. These averages across polling platforms are useful, but they also draw from a small number of polls and combine results from a question each group asked in a slightly different way.

RealClearPolitics shows that in December 2013, about 52.3 percent of the public favored repealing the law. Since 2011, that number hasn’t wavered much.

RealClearPolitics arrived at these figures by averaging reports from Quinnipiac, Rasmussen, Fox and CNN surveys.

American Enterprise Institute included a broader swath of polls in their analysis, which ended up making for a much lower aggregate. Senior fellow Karlyn Bowman said she’d peg the repeal rate at anywhere between 35 to 45 percent, depending on the poll.

Although the numbers vary based on question wording and possible responses, the trends themselves don’t, experts said. The percentage of the country that wants to repeal Obamacare is sizable, but not growing.

"If you look poll to poll, it’s not clear that they’re rising dramatically, but it’s still a big number and something people should pay attention to," Bowman said. "Repeal sounds radical, and we’re just not a very radical kind of people. We like to take the middle ground if possible."

Our ruling

Rubio said, "Americans increasingly want (Obamacare) to be repealed." Depending on which polls you consult, anywhere from about 35 to 50 percent of the nation does want the law repealed. That’s not insignificant.

But we take issue with his claim that as time goes on, more voters are calling for repeal. Experts say the percentage of voters who want Obamacare repealed is staying consistent within each poll.

We rate Rubio’s claim Mostly False.

Read more Political Currents stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category