Dolphins

Miami Dolphins’ Sun Life Stadium renovation plan not on the NFL Annual Meeting agenda

 

The NFL begins its annual meeting Monday, but the Dolphins’ plan to renovate Sun Life Stadium doesn’t appear to be a high priority.

 
Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, holds a press conference to announce the future plans of Sun Life Stadium on Monday, January 14th , 2013.
Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, holds a press conference to announce the future plans of Sun Life Stadium on Monday, January 14th , 2013.
ALEXIA FODERE / For The Miami Herald

abeasley@MiamiHerald.com

The Dolphins’ ongoing quest to upgrade their aging stadium has impacted — albeit indirectly — the agenda at league meetings for some time now.

The Dolphins and South Florida have been passed over for Super Bowls in each of the past two years, with Sun Life Stadium’s antiquated condition the main reason why.

And yet, with the team making what it calls its best offer to Miami-Dade County to date — pledging to pay for the $350 million repairs itself in return for tax relief — there has been a noticeably muted response.

The plan isn’t on the agenda for the NFL Annual Meeting, which officially begins here Monday morning. And although there’s a chance it could be discussed in the next three days, early impressions are it’s not a high priority.

“That’s up to [owner] Steve [Ross], and that will be approved or not approved by the NFL,” Jets owner Woody Johnson said Sunday, when asked about the Dolphins’ latest proposal. “I assume if you want to pay for it yourself, it will be approved.”

If the 30 other teams share Johnson’s attitude, it surely will be.

The only reason that it’s a question: the organization’s latest proposal runs counter to the league’s unstated goal to have a publicly funded aspect to stadium development.

The Dolphins are one of very few teams to own their own building outright — which they hope to change in the coming months.

If their modernization plan is approved by the Miami-Dade County Commission, the Dolphins would hand over Sun Life Stadium to the county, saving them roughly $4 million a year in property taxes.

“Building a stadium and improving a stadium is very difficult,” said Johnson, whose Jets play in Met Life Stadium, which opened in 2010. “A lot of issues come to light, having just done one. Anybody who can get it done, more power to them.”

Ross arrived in Orlando late Sunday afternoon. He is scheduled to speak with reporters this week.

As for the items actually on the agenda this week, the league will consider a series of rules changes.

They include:

• Banning blocks in which offensive players roll up the side of a defender’s legs.

• Moving the line of scrimmage to the 25-yard line for extra points.

• Extending the uprights another 5 yards above the crossbar.

• Moving kickoffs to the 40-yard line.

• Expanding instant replay.

• Eliminating overtime in preseason.

• Permitting trades to take place before the start of the league year.

Read more Miami Dolphins stories from the Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category