Japan: Bunnies put Okunoshima Island on the map

 
 
 A rabbit waits for food at the beach on Okunoshima Island on February 24, 2014 in Takehara, Japan. Okunoshima is a small island located in the Inland Sea of Japan in Hiroshima Prefecture. The Island often called Usagi Jima or "Rabbit Island" is famous for it's rabbit population that has taken over the island and become a tourist attraction with many people coming to the feed the animals and enjoy the islands tourist facilities which include a resort, six hole golf course and camping grounds. During World War II the island was used as a poison gas facility. From 1929 to 1945, the Japanese Army produced five types of poison gas on Okunoshima Island. The island was so secret that local residents were told to keep away and it was removed from area maps. Today ruins of the old forts and chemical factories can be found all across the island. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
A rabbit waits for food at the beach on Okunoshima Island on February 24, 2014 in Takehara, Japan. Okunoshima is a small island located in the Inland Sea of Japan in Hiroshima Prefecture. The Island often called Usagi Jima or "Rabbit Island" is famous for it's rabbit population that has taken over the island and become a tourist attraction with many people coming to the feed the animals and enjoy the islands tourist facilities which include a resort, six hole golf course and camping grounds. During World War II the island was used as a poison gas facility. From 1929 to 1945, the Japanese Army produced five types of poison gas on Okunoshima Island. The island was so secret that local residents were told to keep away and it was removed from area maps. Today ruins of the old forts and chemical factories can be found all across the island. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
Chris McGrath / Getty Images

The rabbits have taken over on Okunoshima Island, turning it into a tourist attraction. During World War II the island was used as a poison gas facility, and its existence was so secret that local residents were told to keep away. It was even removed from maps. But the bunnies, descendants of lab animals, soldiered on. Now often called Usagi Jima or “Rabbit Island,” it attracts visitors who come to the feed the bunnies on the beach and enjoy the island’s tourist facilities, which include a resort, six-hole golf course and camping grounds.

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