Miami Beach

Most Justin Bieber police videos to be released Wednesday

 
WEB VOTE Most of the Miami Beach police videos from Justin Bieber's DUI arrest are scheduled to be released to the public. Gonna watch?

dovalle@MiamiHerald.com

Expect most of the Miami Beach police videos from Justin Bieber’s DUI arrest to soon be made public — and quickly gobbled up by the gossip media.

The Canadian bad-boy pop singer’s defense team said Tuesday it will not object to prosecutors releasing more than 10-plus hours of video footage — with the exception of five video clips that may show Bieber urinating at the Miami Beach police station.

The Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office said it will likely release the video footage Wednesday afternoon.

Miami Beach police arrested Bieber on Jan. 23 on a charge of driving under the influence. Officers accuse Bieber, 19, of drag racing in a high-powered Lamborghini on a street closed off by his security team.

According to police, the pop star admitted to smoking marijuana and taking prescription medication, and a urine analysis showed he tested positive for marijuana and Xanax.

Under Florida’s liberal public records law, most evidence in a criminal case can be released to the media once it has been turned over to the defense team.

At a hearing last week, Bieber’s legal team insisted that several clips, which showed Bieber urinating for a drug test, should be exempt from public view.

“No reason why the media should make a spectacle of that event, even if it happens to be someone who is high profile,” said one of his attorneys, Howard Srebnick.

Lawyers for the media, including the Miami Herald, insist that reporters aren’t out to air Bieber’s genitalia, but simply to protect the public’s right to evidence under Florida law.

Judge William Altfield will view the disputed videos, and review more court filings, before making a decision on March 4.

The footage shows Bieber’s interaction with police at the Miami Beach police station, including him allegedly stumbling around in a suspected state of intoxication.

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