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Bea L. Hines: Pinecrest church offers Ash Wednesday ‘drive-in’ for Lenten ashes

 

bea.hines@gmail.com

Wednesday is the beginning of the Lenten season, which is a time of introspection and repentance prior to Easter, said the Rev. Kathryn Carroll of Christ the King Lutheran Church, 11295 SW 57th Ave., Pinecrest.

“[Ash Wednesday] begins with . . a prayer of confession and the imposition of ashes on the forehead,” Pastor Carroll said. “Christ the King is inviting the community to re-engage in this ancient practice by going outside the building and into the morning commute.”

Motorists who drive by the church on their way to work or school can turn into the circular drive and receive “Ashes Along the Way,” Pastor Carroll said.

So, for all of you who think you are too busy to stop by your church to receive your ashes on Ash Wednesday, Pastor Carroll and others will be outdoors from 7 to 8:30 a.m. to offer ashes and a moment of prayer to all drivers who pull in.

There will also be Ash Wednesday services in the church at noon and 7:30 p.m.

During the rest of the Lenten season, there will be Wednesday evening suppers at 6:30 p.m. and a brief worship at 7:15 p.m. featuring the theme: “Making Change.” Dinner reservations can be made by calling 305-665-5063. For more information, go to www.ctkmiami.org.

Public Invited to Amistad Sunday

The Rev. R. Joaquin Willis and the congregation of Liberty City’s Church of the Open Door invites the community to its 17th Annual Amistad Sunday at 10:30 a.m. March 9. Graduates of American Missionary Association colleges will be honored during the service. Dr. Joe A. Lee, former president of Tougaloo College and Alabama State University, will be the speaker.

The honorees are: Carol Davis Byrd, Fisk University; James Cole, Esq., Talladega College; Valerie Riles, Howard University; Dr. Katherine Latimore, Hampton University; Donzaleigh Lisa McKinney (posthumously), Dillard University; and DaNita Jackson-Jenkins, Clark-Atlanta University.

Amistad Sunday celebrates the founding of the American Missionary Association, the first abolitionist organization in the United States with integrated leadership. It established more than 500 schools, churches, libraries and universities for newly freed African Americans.

The day also commemorates the 1839 action of a group of enslaved Africans who broke free aboard the schooner Amistad while being transported around the island of Cuba. The Africans tried to sail the small vessel back to Africa, but were captured by the U.S. Revenue Brig Washington, charged with mutiny and threatened with return to slavery.

Connecticut abolitionists formed the Amistad Committee, which organized a legal defense, eased the captives' confinement during the lengthy court case and eventually funded their return to Africa after winning a favorable decision from the U.S. Supreme Court.

The community is invited to the service at 6001 NW Eighth Ave., Liberty City.

Annual AIDS Awareness Week

The National Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS will be March 2-9. The week is recognized by Churches United for HIV/AIDS Prevention, and is an annual HIV-awareness campaign. It highlights the contributions and impact congregations are making in the areas of HIV prevention, testing, direct service, advocacy and community engagement.

Starting Sunday, churches, synagogues, mosques and other faith-based organizations are asked to pause for a moment of prayer for the healing of HIV/AIDS during their worship services, where they will also provide AIDS information to their communities.

The national campaign attempts to call men and women of faith to prayer and to take aggressive action in dismantling the AIDS stigma; to model unconditional love and compassion to all persons living with and affected by HIV; to disseminate factual HIV education and to engage communities in HIV testing and treatment services.

The week of activities will include a community prayer breakfast 9 a.m. March 4 at Bethel Apostolic Temple, 1855 NW 119th St., featuring the Rev. Marvin Charles Lue Jr. of Trinity CME Church of Miami as the guest speaker, and a “Sing for a Cure” concert at 7 p.m. March 7 at Ebenezer United Methodist Church, 2001 NW 35th St.

Confidential, rapid HIV testing will be available at all venues.

For more information, call the Rev. Darryl Baxter, president of the Family Foundation and chairman of the Churches United Conference at 305-978-7100. You may also call Claudia Slater, secretary of the conference, at 305-691-0699.

Tibet’s sacred sounds

The sacred sounds of Tibet will be performed and discussed by Lama Karma Chotso, the resident lama, or spiritual leader, of Kagyu Shedrup Choling, a Tibetan Buddhist center she founded 17 years ago in El Portal.

The lecture/performance will begin at 7 p.m. March 4 in Room 140 at Florida International University, 11200 SW Eighth St. The event is sponsored by FIU’s Program in the Study of Spirituality. For more information, email spirituality@fiu.edu.

Author discusses sacred, cultural

Richard Kearney, author of more than 20 books on European philosophy and literature, will discuss the differences between the sacred and cultural on March 7 at Florida International University, 11200 SW Eighth St.

Kearney, whose works also includes two novels and a collection of poetry, will encourage listeners to “adopt a more complex faith, beyond doubt and dogmatic certainties, to rediscover a hidden holiness in everyday life.”

The event is free and open to the public.

Women of Faith discussion at UM

A dinner of Abrahamic Traditions and a panel discussion hosted by the Atlantic Institute is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. March 12 at the Newman Alumni Center at the University of Miami, 6200 San Amaro Dr., Coral Gables.

The theme of the luncheon is “Women of faith in the modern world: What is the role of women in my religion?”

The panel will consist of the Rev. Dr. Laurinda Hafner, senior pastor of Coral Gables Congregational Church; the Rev. Diane Shoaf, associate dean, Florida Center for Theological Studies; Rabbi Efrat Zarrhool, of Adult Jewish Learning; and Rabia Kahn, resident scholar, Islamic Foundation of South Florida.

Tickets cost $15 per person or $125 per table of 10. To make a reservation, email miami@theatlanticinstitute.org.

Spring is coming at First United

Get ready for the Spring Fling, hosted by the First United Methodist Church of South Miami. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, and will feature many craft items handmade by church members, white elephant surprises, kitchen items of all kinds, clothing. shoes, purses, accessories, toys, CDs, DVDs, VHS tapes, records and holiday items at a reduced cost.

A combo lunch of a hot dog, drink and chips will be for sale. All of the funds collected will go toward mission projects in the church and in the community.

For more information, call the church office at 305-667-7508.

Send all items at least two weeks in advance to Religion Notes, c/o Neighbors, 2000 NW 150th Ave., Suite 1105, Pembroke Pines, FL 33028, fax it to 954-538-7018 or email bea.hines@gmail.com. Photos are accepted but cannot be returned.

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