Michigan's Dingell, longest serving House member, will retire

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

Michigan Rep. John Dingell, the House of Representatives' longest serving member, is retiring when his current term ends.

The 87-year-old Detroit area Democrat, who succeeded his father in the congressional seat in 1955, last year set the record for Capitol Hill longevity.

Dingell's power base was regarded as the Energy and Commerce Committee, which holds tremendous clout over regulatory, environmental and health issues. Dingell is also known as a strong supporter of workers' rights.

He is still sharp, though he gets around now in a wheelchair or crutches. Dingell's retirement is the latest in a string of veterans leaving, notably a senior Energy and Commerce colleagues, Democrat Henry Waxman of Califiornia.

 

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