Lithuania opens CIA black site probe

 
 
Mustafa al Hawsawi, a Saudi who allegedly helped the 9/11 hijackers with money transfers and travel arrangements, is shown posing for the International Committee of the Red Cross at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo in an image intended for his family members. It turned up on a website sympathetic to al Qaida in the summer of 2012, although it was believed taken in Camp 7, the secret Guantanamo lockup, in the 2009.
Mustafa al Hawsawi, a Saudi who allegedly helped the 9/11 hijackers with money transfers and travel arrangements, is shown posing for the International Committee of the Red Cross at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo in an image intended for his family members. It turned up on a website sympathetic to al Qaida in the summer of 2012, although it was believed taken in Camp 7, the secret Guantanamo lockup, in the 2009.

Lithuanian prosecutors say they have opened an investigation into allegations that a Saudi captive at Guantánamo Bay, Mustafa al-Hawsawi, was held at a secret CIA detention site in the Baltic country.

The prosecutors’ decision Thursday follows a Jan. 29 Vilnius court ruling overturning a previous decision not to investigate the possible illegal transportation of people across the state border. Investigators closed a similar case in 2011, citing lack of evidence.

Human rights watchdog Redress says it was highly likely that Hawsawi was secretly held in Lithuania sometime between March 2004 and September 2006.

He is currently detained at the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where he is one of five men accused as co-conspirators in the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, and facing a death-penalty war crimes trial.

Read more Guantánamo stories from the Miami Herald

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