Carolyn Hax

Carolyn Hax: Happily married despite ‘cold feet’

 

Dear Carolyn: You’ve run a number of columns on people having cold feet and the relationship (later) failing. But what about having cold feet and the marriage works out?

I ask because my mother (and other ladies in her generation) scoffs at cold feet. She told me that my dad had it, and she just “let him” freak out. He got his act together after a few days, and she married him. They’ve been together 50-plus years. My aunts tell me that a couple of my uncles did the same, and these women just brushed it off! It all worked out for them too.

During my bridesmaid days, I remember a friend or two completely freaking out — the “What am I doing? Why am I marrying him? I don’t want to do this. This is a bad idea!” sentiment. Those worked out too. I’ve seen accounts where people claim they had cold feet after the relationship collapses. But that’s so easy to say in the afterthought!

My friends don’t remember saying that stuff, but I bet if they got divorced, they would. What do you say for those who have cold feet but end up happily married decades later?

Cold Feet

Both the seeds of doubt and the definition of “it all worked out” are highly individual. Does that mean they were genuinely happy — or does that just mean they didn’t divorce? Some pretty miserable unions manage to go the distance, and I don’t see that as something to celebrate.

When brides and grooms have doubts, I hope they face them squarely. I hope the people they confide in have the compassion and presence of mind to draw the bride or groom out a bit, and then listen carefully enough to offer the right kind of reassurance — either that it’s OK to feel nervous or that it’s OK to walk away. Presumably loved ones know the bride or groom well enough to recognize whether “completely freaking out” is in character or not, and founded or not.

I hope they don’t bring any biases for or against marriage or for or against the people involved to their counsel, at least not without labeling them as such.

I think “cold feet” sufferers of all kinds, even the ones who just are nervous about the significance of the commitment, should read here or hear from someone they love: It’s OK to face your doubts, whether the episode lasts an hour or two or pre-empts the wedding itself. The only wedding that has to happen is the one the couple enters freely and unburdened.

I’m not sure that answers the question, but that’s my answer.

Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com.

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