Some Guantánamo captives may get family visits

 

The Miami Herald

With the prison camps now in their 13th year, the U.S. military is willing to allow some war-on-terror captives to have family visits — if the International Red Cross can find a Caribbean country to host the prisoners’ relatives between day trips to this remote U.S. Navy base.

It is not yet known which captives would be allowed to meet wives, children or other relatives at this base. Of the 155 detainees, federal review boards have approved 77 for release, with security arrangements.

A key obstacle to the visits is the U.S. Southern Command’s insistence that family members would be forbidden from sleeping at this 45-square-mile outpost of more than 5,000 residents with hotels, a tent city and suburban-style neighborhoods.

So such visits would require the International Committee of the Red Cross and the U.S. government reaching agreement with a third country in the region as the base of an air bridge for captives’ relatives on day trips to family reunions.

Read more here

Read more World Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  • Jamaican ends legal challenge to anti-sodomy law

    A Jamaican gay rights activist who brought a legal challenge to the Caribbean island's anti-sodomy law says he has withdrawn the case after growing fearful about safety.

  • Mexico's Pemex says production to increase in 2015

    Mexico's state-owned oil company is estimating its crude production will increase to 2.4 million barrels per day in 2015, compared with the 2.35 million barrels per day it expects to output this year.

  • Syria’s violence prompts worse humanitarian crisis in a century

    Nearly half of Syria’s population has been displaced either internally or externally as refugees in the worst humanitarian crisis to strike the Middle East in at least a century, according to new data released by the International Rescue Committee.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category