Hillary Clinton’s new gospel

 

In her hear-me-roar mode, Hillary Clinton told an audience of New York University students Thursday that the best thing a woman in public life could do was not take it personally. “It’s important to learn how to take criticism seriously but not personally, and to do that you have to be willing to hear what others who are your critics are saying and to evaluate where they are coming from,” she said.

What a relief to know that the woman who felt persecuted by the world in her husband’s administration has learned an important life lesson. Now all she has to do is spread the gospel to her supporters. Don’t be a whiny woman seems to sum it up the best. Stop craving victimhood, ladies!

No more claiming legitimate scrutiny of Clinton is an “obsession.”

No more conflating abortion with respect for women or accusing every pro-life advocate of being anti-woman.

No more telling women they are worse off than they are or ignoring men who have suffered worse in this recession than women.

No more citing a patently false earnings statistic to pander to women.

In all seriousness, Clinton might go a long way toward freeing women from the victim role. She can counsel women (and men) to address issues on the merits and not assume there is a vast conspiracy out to get them. She should acknowledge and welcome the tough scrutiny that goes hand-in-hand with politics, especially when running for president. She may wonder “what difference does it make?” — but voters and opponents have the right to explore any aspect of her public life.

Clinton shouldn’t be blamed for the left’s stubborn perpetuation of victimhood, which is not limited by any means to gender discrimination. But she could make a difference. Ending the whining is a good place to start.

© 2014, The Washington Post

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