Miami-Dade’s sewer czars have your backside on Super Bowl Sunday — so flush away

 
 
Miami-Dade’s sewer agency warns that on football’s biggest day, water pressure is expected to drop by as much as 18 to 22 pounds per square inch when the loo is at its highest usage —just before and through halftime, and after the game.
Miami-Dade’s sewer agency warns that on football’s biggest day, water pressure is expected to drop by as much as 18 to 22 pounds per square inch when the loo is at its highest usage —just before and through halftime, and after the game.

crabin@MiamiHerald.com

The sewage czars of South Florida have got your backside on Super Bowl Sunday.

Their mission: To make your toilet bowl flush properly during the big game.

So many people use the john just during halftime and after the game that water pressure at Miami-Dade County’s three wastewater treatment plants can drop to fearfully low levels. To the rescue: a beleaguered agency with crumbling pipes that has assigned workers to monitor the highs and lows of water usage and make sure things keep flowing.

The Water and Sewer Department “will monitor consumption and may have to make an audible call and add another pump to the system at each plant to compensate for the decrease in pressure,” according to a brief memo released Friday.

Now that’s a relief.

The county is having to raise water rates as much as 33 percent over the next five years to help pay for a $12 billion overhaul of the system that is expected to take more than a decade. Thousands of miles of crumbling underwater pipes and the county’s three degraded water treatment plants need replacement or renovation.

The federal government got involved after county pipes ruptured more than 65 times between 2010 and 2012, spilling 47 million gallons of untreated sewage into our water and roadways. The biggest offender was the Central District Water Treatment Plant on Virginia Key, which lost 19 million gallons of sewage over the same time period.

But those issues are for another day.

On Sunday, the county just asks that you “sit back, enjoy the game and the commercials confidently knowing that WASD is protecting your blind side.”

Read more Miami-Dade stories from the Miami Herald

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