Travel briefs

 

Airlines

Fliers give slim-line seats a big fat no

“Slim-line” seats, with thinner seat-back cushions, are increasingly popular with airlines because they weigh less and help squeeze more passengers into a plane.

But the seats may not be so popular with passengers.

A new survey by the travel website TripAdvisor shows that many passengers who have tried slim-line seats are not fans.

In the survey of 1,391 travelers, the website found that nearly half weren’t sure whether they had sat in slim-line seats.

But of those who said they had tried the seats, 83 percent said they were less comfortable than traditional seats, 8 percent said the slim-line seats were more comfortable, and 9 percent said they couldn’t tell the difference.

Delta Air Lines is the latest of several major carriers to announce plans to install slim-line seats. Delta spokesman Paul Skrbec said the TripAdvisor survey was lacking because it didn’t ask passengers which airlines they flew when they tried the seats. The airline’s internal surveys show passengers like Delta’s slim-line seats, he said.

United, Alaska, Southwest and Spirit are among the other major airlines that have installed slimmer, lighter seats in the last few years.

Colorado

Airport installs pot ‘amniesty boxes’

Colorado Springs Airport recently installed three green metal containers in the terminal where travelers can deposit marijuana, which is legal to buy in Colorado but banned in the airport.

With recreational marijuana now on sale in Colorado, Denver International and Colorado Springs airports have made it clear that travelers cannot bring pot through their facilities.

The folks at the Colorado Springs airport don’t want travelers to dump bags of overlooked pot into the terminal trash bins, so the airport has installed “amnesty boxes.”

The boxes are monitored 24 hours a day, with Colorado Springs police responsible for emptying them and destroying any drugs.

Air travel

Fares continue up

The price to board an airliner in the United States has risen for the fourth straight year, making it increasingly expensive to fly almost anywhere.

The average domestic roundtrip ticket, including tax, reached $363.42 last year, up more than $7 from the prior year, according to an Associated Press analysis of travel data collected from millions of flights throughout the country.

The 2 percent increase outpaced inflation, which stood at 1.5 percent.

Airfares have risen nearly 12 percent since their low in the depths of the Great Recession in 2009, when adjusted for inflation, the analysis showed.

Miami Herald

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