Crossing the border on high-speed rail

 

McClatchy Foreign Staff

Imagine traveling between San Antonio, Texas, and the northern industrial hub of Monterrey in less than two hours on a high-speed rail link.

Passengers would pre-clear customs and immigration at the respective terminals, making a border stop unnecessary.

That’s the dream of Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat, who last week brought Mexican officials and Texas Department of Transportation Commissioner Jeff Austin to the office of U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx to discuss the proposal.

There is high traffic – both ground and air – between Monterrey and South Texas. Monterrey, after all, is Mexico’s wealthiest and most “Americanized” city. Many regiomontanos, as Monterrey residents call themselves, are for more likely to visit Texas than travel to Mexico City.

Currently, it takes about five hours driving between San Antonio and Monterrey, that is, if there are no tie-ups at the border.

According to this article about the meeting with Foxx, the project would be binational, but the Mexicans seem to be moving faster. Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto announced a railway initiative on taking office on Dec. 1, 2012, and railway reforms before Congress may open up the sector to private investment.

Cuellar’s plan got backing this week from Henry Cisneros, a four-time former mayor of San Antonio and former Cabinet member under President Bill Clinton.

On a visit to Monterrey, a local newspaper quoted Cisneros as saying, "Anything we can do to strengthen the bonds of transportation, transportation systems at the border … is for the welfare of the region.”

Read more World Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
In this Aug. 26, 2014 photo, Police Col. Decha Promsuwan, an investigator in a surrogacy scandal involving a Japanese businessman, shows documents during an interview at Lumpini police station in Bangkok,Thailand. Wassana, a young Thai woman, answered an online ad offering $10,000 for surrogate mothers and is now embroiled in the case of a mysterious Japanese man, Mitsutoki Shigeta, who police say fathered at least 16 children through surrogates. The case has captivated Thailand and is at the center of a growing scandal over commercial surrogacy, an industry that thrived on semi-secrecy and legal loopholes that the country's military government now vows to ban.

    9 steps a Japanese man took to 16 surrogate babies

    Police say Japanese businessman Mitsutoki Shigeta followed nine key steps on his path to fathering 16 surrogate babies in Thailand, born starting in June 2013. It's unclear whether he went through all of the steps for every baby; four are in Cambodia and the rest remain in Thailand. Here's how he did it:

  •  
Police beat a protester during clashes in Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. Anti-government protesters stormed Pakistan’s state television building Monday, forcing the channel briefly off the air as they clashed with police and pushed closer to the prime minister’s residence. The violence comes as part of the mass demonstrations led by Muslim cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri and opposition politician Imran Khan that demand Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif resign.

    Pakistan parliament meets over political crisis

    Pakistan's parliament has convened over the political crisis roiling the country as thousands of anti-government protesters remain camped out in front of the parliament building, demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

  • S. Korea soldiers charged with homicide over death

    Military prosecutors have charged four soldiers with homicide over the hazing death of a young army conscript in April, South Korea's Defense Ministry said Tuesday.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category