Sen. Lee to deliver Tea Party response to State of the Union

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

The Tea Party will have its say in response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address Jan. 28, as Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, delivers an address after the speech.

Lee is known as one of the Senate's most staunch conservatives, a strong backer of the grassroots Tea Party movement. Republicans also plan a party response; no details have yet been released.

“For the Tea Party movement, 2014 is not just about taking back the Senate, but it is also about putting forward conservative ideas that will allow for America to prosper," said Amy Kremer Tea Party Express Chairman.

Lee, she said, "has been both a Tea Party hero for supporters across the nation, and a conservative leader in the Upper Chamber. He has introduced tangible policy solutions to some of America’s biggest problems."

The Express, along with several other conservative groups, is pushing its candidates for congressional seats across the nation, in some cases challenging veteran Republican incumbents.

Lee plans to deliver his address after Obama speaks, at the National Press Club in downtown Washington, D.C. The Express began hosting these responses in 2011; last year's speaker was Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.

 

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