Dining

Top 5 museum restaurants

 

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

After a day of taking in culture and admiring art, travelers have earned their coffee and a fantastic view. Whether you are planning a romantic dinner or just looking for a spot to grab a light meal during your next museum day, the members and editors of VirtualTourist.com have scouted the Top 5 Museum Restaurants.

•  Musee d’Orsay Restaurant & Cafe Campana at Musee d’Orsay, Paris. Museums are one of the most highly regarded architectural landmarks of our time, but few new builds can compare to the history of the Musee d’Orsay. Housed in a former train station, the museum holds some of the greatest artistic treasures from 1848 to the mid-20th century. Attached to the station was a luxury hotel, the dining room of which was preserved and turned into the museum’s primary restaurant. With gilded ceilings and ornate chandeliers, it is just as dramatic as when it opened over 100 years ago.

In addition to the traditional restaurant, the museum also revamped the Cafe de l’Horloge in its recent renovation. Now called the Cafe Campana, the eatery located behind the building’s clock face was inspired by Emile Galle, a French glassmaker, and the Art Nouveau movement.

The main restaurant hosts a special Thursday evening deal, includes a discovery menu, drinks and entrance to the museum’s collections for about $75.

•  The Modern at MoMA, New York. Few restaurants can boast a Michelin star or three stars from the New York Times, and The Modern at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has garnered both. The restaurant is part of chef Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group, serving French-American cuisine with Alsatian influence. The Dining Room serves a prix-fixe menu and overlooks 31 sculptures in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden.

The venue also has a more casual option, the Bar Room, which serves small plates and accepts walk-ins. Offerings include Langoustine and Razor Clam Tartare, Squab and Foie Gras Croustillant, and a Modern Black Forest Fantaisie.

•  Collections Cafe at Chihuly Garden and Glass, Seattle. Located in the shadow of the Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass spans 1.5 acres and provides an overview of the career and work of glass artist Dale Chihuly. In addition to the centerpiece Glasshouse, the Exhibition Hall houses eight galleries and the Collections Cafe, the venue’s primary eatery.

The Cafe decor highlights Chihuly’s passion for collecting, including his collection of vintage accordions, which hang from the ceiling. The menu is inspired by Chihuly’s travels with ingredients and wines from the Northwest — highlights include a variety of fish dishes, as well as pork, meatball and lamb dishes as well. The venue serves lunch, dinner, and a weekend brunch menu.

•  Ray’s and Stark Bar at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles. Just under three years old, Ray’s at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a truly Californian take on museum dining. In the center of the BP Grand Entrance, the restaurant is completely open to the courtyard, providing great people watching and al fresco dining, as well as a view of Chris Burden’s Urban Light sculpture.

With an on-site garden and a wood-burning oven and grill, the restaurant’s cuisine emphasizes farm-to-table, seasonal fare, including peppers and sunchokes from the garden, wood-fired pizzas, and a variety of small plates. The venue also offers 20 types of bottled water from around the world.

•  Acropolis Museum Restaurant, Athens. Most travelers to Greece plan to visit ruins, but what about admiring them during a delicious meal? The Acropolis Museum is about 1,000 feet from the Acropolis itself, on the pedestrian walkway of Dionysiou Areopagitou Street, the central route for exploring the city’s archaeological sites. This conveniently location makes it a great place to grab a bite after a long day of exploring the ruins.

The museum’s restaurant provides panoramic, unobstructed views of the Acropolis. The menu features hot dishes based on traditional Greek favorites. The restaurant is open during museum hours, but also on Friday nights, when it stays open until midnight and offers exceptional night views of the Acropolis.

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