Anthony Bosch: A-Rod knew he was taking banned substances

 

Anthony Bosch, who ran the Miami-based anti-aging clinic Biogenesis, said on ‘60 Minutes’ that he helped Alex Rodriguez take banned drugs and that A-Rod sometimes took them during games

 
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Face to face: </span>In this undated image taken from video and provided by ‘60 Minutes,’ Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch, left, talks with correspondent Scott Pelley about injecting Alex Rodriguez with banned substances in New York. Bosch explained how he provided Rodriguez with performance-enhancing drugs during Rodriguez's relationship with Biogenesis.
Face to face: In this undated image taken from video and provided by ‘60 Minutes,’ Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch, left, talks with correspondent Scott Pelley about injecting Alex Rodriguez with banned substances in New York. Bosch explained how he provided Rodriguez with performance-enhancing drugs during Rodriguez's relationship with Biogenesis.
AP

bjackson@MiamiHerald.com

Anthony Bosch, who said previously that he provided performance-enhancing drugs to Alex Rodriguez, said in a televised interview Sunday that he injected Rodriguez with some of those drugs, that Rodriguez’s associates tried to intimidate him to keep him from cooperating with Major League Baseball’s investigation and that Rodriguez would take banned substances during games and shortly before them.

“Alex is scared of needles, so at times he would ask me to inject,” Bosch, who ran the Miami-based anti-aging clinic Biogenesis, said on CBS’ 60 Minutes.

The interview aired a day after an arbitrator reduced Rodriguez’s suspension from 211 games to 162 — a full season — plus any playoff games.

Bosch said the Yankees third baseman paid him $12,000 a month in cash and took six banned substances, including testosterone, insulin growth factor 1, human growth hormone and some different forms of peptides.

“Alex knew they were [banned],” Bosch said, adding that he personally delivered the substances to him at least a dozen times.

Bosch said when Rodriguez became a client in 2010, “the first words out of his mouth were, ‘What did Manny Ramirez take in 2008 and 2009? What were you giving Manny Ramirez?’

“Alex wanted to know. He would study the product, study the substance, would study the dosage. The most important was the 800 home run club, which was only going to have one member, Alex Rodriguez.”

Rodriguez, 38, has 654 homers in 20 seasons.

Bosch said he would draw blood from Rodriguez at different times to see how quickly the drugs dissipated, which enabled Rodriguez to pass 12 random drug tests.

He also advised Rodriguez he would greatly decrease his chance of testing positive if he submitted urine “from the middle of the stream,” because “most of the metabolites are in the beginning of the stream or the end of the stream.”

Bosch said Rodriguez would put testosterone “troches in his mouth 10 minutes before game time. … By the time they get back into the locker room and there was any possibility of testing, they would test clean. They’re so small, you could literally take it while sitting in the dugout, and people would think it’s either sunflower seeds or a piece of candy or gum.”

That drug helped Rodriguez, Bosch said, because “it gives him more energy, more strength, more focus. In combination with the growth hormone, that combination would make playing the game of baseball a lot easier.”

Bosch said he feared for his life because his ex-girlfriend received a text message in Spanish saying Bosch “would not live to see the end of the year.”

MLB, which is paying Bosch’s legal fees and provided him with a personal security detail, told CBS that the most worrisome threat to Bosch came from someone associated with Rodriguez.

Bosch said that before he received death threats, associates of Rodriguez asked him to sign an affidavit saying that he never offered performance-enhancing drugs to Rodriguez. Bosch said he declined.

“One of his associates said he felt I should leave town,” Bosch said. “[He said], ‘We’ll get you a plane ticket to Colombia, stay there until this blows over.’ 

He said Rodriguez’s associates offered to pay him $20,000 or $25,000 a month and told him, “When you come back, we’ll pay up another $150,000.”

Bosch said he also declined that offer.

Bosch was asked why he provided performance-enhancing drugs to players when he knew the drugs were banned by baseball.

“I did it because I had a responsibility to do it,” he said. “My approach was you’re going to do this, let me show you how to do this, let me educate you, let’s do it the right way, and sure, let’s not get caught while we’re doing it.

“Unfortunately, this is part of baseball. When you ask these guys to play [so many] games, back-to-back, their bodies break down. This has always been part of the game.”

Bosch provided CBS with 500 text messages that he exchanged with Rodriguez. CBS said the names of no performance-enhancing drugs appeared in those messages, but Bosch said they used code words.

Rodriguez has denied all of the charges and is expected to file a lawsuit against Major League Baseball in an attempt to reverse his suspension, which would cost him $25 million in salary.

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