Pope Francis names Haitian cardinal, three others from Latin America

 

Pope Francis named his first batch of cardinals on Sunday, choosing the first for Haiti, a move inline with his belief that the church must pay more attention to the poor.

The Bishop of Les Cayes, Chibly Langlois, was among the names read out by the pope.

In all, the pope chose 19 men from Asia, Africa, Canada, Burkina Faso and Latin America.

They are: Orani Joao Tempesta, Archbishop of Rio de Janeiro; Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano, Archbishop of Managua, Nicaragua and Ricardo Ezzati Andrello, Archbishop of Santiago del Chile, Chile.

But advocates for victims of sex abuse by Catholic clergy said they felt let down that Francis didn't unequivocally embrace their calls that prelates who haven't made a clean break with past practices of covering up pedophile behavior never be promoted.

Francis read out the 19 names as he spoke from his studio window to a crowd of tens of thousands of well-wishes and curious in St. Peter's Square.

Sixteen of the appointees are younger than 80, meaning they would be currently eligible to elect the next pope, which is a cardinal's most important task, after the Feb. 22 ceremony to formally install them.

Since his election in March as the first pontiff from Latin America, the pope has broken tradition after tradition in terms of protocol and style at the Vatican. But in Sunday's list, Francis stuck to the church's rule of having no more than 120 cardinals eligible to elect the next pontiff.

The College of Cardinals is currently 13 shy of that 120-mark among eligible-to-vote members. In addition, three cardinals will turn 80 by May. That means Francis chose the exact number of new cardinals needed to bring the voting ranks up to 120 during the next few months.

Some appointments were expected, including that of his new secretary of state, the Italian archbishop Pietro Parolin, and the German head of the Vatican's watchdog office for doctrinal orthodoxy, Gerhard Ludwig Mueller. Two others named Sunday also come from the curia, as the Holy See's Rome-based bureaucracy is known.

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said the pope's selection of churchmen from Haiti and Burkina Faso reflects Francis' attention to the destitute as a core part of the church's mission.

The archbishop of Ouagadougou, Philipe Ouedraogo, said he thought reporters had made a mistake when they called him about his promotion to cardinal's rank, as he had no advance word from the Vatican. He also embraced Francis' vision of a church toiling for those on the margins of society.

"I fully recognize myself in his vision and pastoral philosophy that, like Jesus, identifies himself with the poor and the sick," the African prelate said. Ouedraogo, very popular in his homeland, had recently opposed a proposed change to the constitution to allow the country's president, in power since 1987, to run for another term.

Once again, the cardinal's red hat eluded Dublin Archbishop Diarmuid Martin. The prelate in that traditionally Catholic country has angered some in the Vatican by strongly criticizing how the hierarchy handled the worldwide clerical sex abuse scandal.

The U.S.-based Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, or SNAP, expressed disappointment that Francis didn't promote Martin.

"While far from perfect, he's better" than some other prelates on abuse, said David Clohessy, director of the group's chapter in St. Louis.

SNAP also criticized the choice of Mueller, saying he had a "dreadful" record on children's safety.

Under the tenure of Mueller, who was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI, a fellow German, critics have accused of Vatican's handling of the sex abuse scandal, including letting pedophile priests transfer from parish to parish when complaints were made.

Here’s the complete list of new cardinals named by Pope Francis. They will be installed at a Vatican ceremony on Feb. 22:

Pietro Parolin, Titular Archbishop of Acquapendente, Secretary of State.

Lorenzo Baldisseri, Titular Archbishop of Diocleziana, Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops.

Gerhard Ludwig Mueller, Archbishop—Bishop emeritus of Regensburg, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

Beniamino Stella, Titular Archbishop of Midila, Prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy.

Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster, United Kingdom.

Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano, Archbishop of Managua, Nicaragua .

Gerald Cyprien Lacroix, Archbishop of Quebec, Canada.

Jean—Pierre Kutwa, Archbishop of Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

Orani Joao Tempesta, O.Cist., Archbishop of Rio de Janeiro.

Gualtiero Bassetti, Archbishop of Perugia—Citta della Pieve, Italy.

Mario Aurelio Poli, Archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Andrew Yeom Soo jung, Archbishop of Seoul, South Korea.

Ricardo Ezzati Andrello, S.D.B., Archbishop of Santiago del Chile, Chile.

Philippe Nakellentuba Ouedraogo, Archbishop of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Orlando B. Quevedo, O.M.I., Archbishop of Cotabato, Philippines.

Chibly Langlois, Bishop of Les Cayes, Haiti.

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Titular Archbishop of Mesembria.

Fernando Sebastian Aguilar, C.M.F., Archbishop emeritus of Pamplona.

Kelvin Edward Felix, Archbishop emeritus of Castries

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