Cook’s Corner

General Tso's Chicken a reader favorite

 
 
 <span class="cutline_leadin">General Tso's Chicken:</span> Battered chicken is deep-fried for this restaurant favorite.
General Tso's Chicken: Battered chicken is deep-fried for this restaurant favorite.
PHIL MASTURZO / MCT

Main Dish

General Tso’s Chicken

2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks

1 egg white

Dash each salt and pepper

1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon cornstarch

Vegetable oil

For the sauce:

1/2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon hoisin sauce

1 tablespoon good-quality sherry

1 tablespoon chicken broth

3 tablespoons sugar

2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar

1 tablespoon sesame oil

To finish:

3 large slices fresh ginger, minced

1 green onion, white part only, thinly sliced

2 garlic cloves, minced

6 dried red chiles, crushed

Marinate the chicken overnight in a mixture made by beating together the egg white, salt, pepper, minced ginger and cornstarch.

When ready to cook, heat 8 to 10 cups oil in a large pot until very hot (when a haze forms). Cook a few pieces of chicken at a time in the oil for a minute or so, so that the outside is crispy and the inside is moist. Drain on paper towels.

Combine the sauce ingredients and set aside.

To finish: Coat a wok or large skillet with oil from the deep frying and heat until it begins to smoke. Briefly stir-fry the ginger, garlic, onion and peppers. Add the sauce, then the fried chicken; stir-fry briefly until it is nicely glazed. Serve immediately with rice. Makes 6 servings.

Per serving: 174 calories (30 percent from fat), 5.8 g fat (1.2 g saturated), 72 mg cholesterol, 18.3 g protein, 10.1 g carbohydrates, 0.3 g fiber, 489 mg sodium. (Note: An earlier version of this recipe gave the wrong sodium content.)

Source: Linda Cicero Cook’s Corner


Dessert

Quick Pecan Pie

2 eggs

2/3 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup light corn syrup

2 tablespoons butter, melted

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup pecans

1 8- or 9-inch pie shell

12 pecan halves for garnish

Heat oven to 450 degrees.

Place eggs, sugar, salt, syrup, butter and vanilla in a blender and process until mixed. Add the pecans and pulse a couple of times — just long enough to chop the pecans; you don't want them to get too small.

Pour filling into pie shell. Arrange pecan halves on top. Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven to 350 degrees and bake 30 minutes longer. Cool on a wire rack. Makes 8 servings.

Source: Linda Cicero Cook’s Corner

Per serving: 386 calories (49 percent from fat), 21.6 g fat, (5 g saturated, 10 g monounsaturated), 54 mg cholesterol, 4.3 g protein, 46 g carbohydrate, 1.7 g fiber, 324 mg sodium.


Dressing

Soy Sesame Dressing

3/4 cup soy sauce (low-sodium is OK)

1/2 cup rice-wine vinegar

1 tablespoon sesame oil

4 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Place all the ingredients in a glass jar, fasten lid tightly and shake well to combine. Use as a salad dressing or over steamed vegetables. Makes about 1 1/2 cups, 6 servings 2-tablespoon servings.

Source: Linda Cicero Cook’s Corner

Per serving: 105 calories (30 percent from fat), 3.4 g fat, (0.5 g saturated, 1.4 g monounsaturated), 0 cholesterol, 2.7 g protein, 15.5 g carbohydrate, 0.7 g fiber, 2,031 mg sodium.


Sleuth’s Corner

Q: I hope someone can tell me if there is a recipe for something my grandpa misses called livermush. He is from South Carolina and says his mother always packed this in sandwiches for his lunch. He was a migrant worker who came here to pick tomatoes and never got back home.

Ollie Blake , Homestead


Q: I'm trying to find a recipe for General Tso's Chicken that you had in the Cooks Corner quite a while ago. I kept meaning to put the clipping on a recipe card but never got around to it. Now I can’t find it. Can you help?

B. C. , Miami

A: This recipe really resonates with readers. It seems I get a request for a copy at least once every few months. I adapted it more than 20 years ago from a recipe furnished by gone but not-forgotten Wah Shing restaurant.

Q: I’ve lost your quick recipe for pecan pie. I always made it for New Years and couldn’t find it this year. I had to use one from a cookbook that not only was complicated and tedious but actually didn’t taste as good. Can you help?

Stephany DeMille

A: The recipe dates to 1987, when we were all getting our first food processors (you can also make this in a blender). No need for messy cooking on the stove and looking for that elusive perfect temperature for the filling to set properly. You just dump the ingredients in the bowl and start whirring.

Gardner’s dressing

Michelle of Coconut Grove asked if anyone had the recipe for the soy sesame dressing sold in the produce department of the old Gardner’s Markets. We’re still hoping for the authentic recipe, but in the meantime here’s one I make in large quantities because it is so versatile and keeps well in the refrigerator. Add pureed ginger or minced green onion or substitute orange juice for half the vinegar if you like. I use it on on steamed vegetables andr soba noodles as well as on salad greens.

Send questions and responses to LindaCiceroCooks@aol.com or Food, The Miami Herald, 3511 NW 91st Ave., Doral, FL 33172. Replies cannot be guaranteed.

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