Weeknight meals

Pork with apples yields sweet, savory comfort

 
 

Dinner is served: Pork chops paired with apples three ways — apples, apple cider and applejack — make a quick, comfort-food meal.
Dinner is served: Pork chops paired with apples three ways — apples, apple cider and applejack — make a quick, comfort-food meal.
Bill Hogan / MCT

Main dish

Pork Chops and Triple Apple Threat

Serve with butternut or acorn squash puree, topped with a little butter, and a winter greens salad.

2 pork chops (on the bone), 6 to 8 ounces each

About 1/2 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper

2 tablespoons olive oil or bacon fat

1 small red onion, chopped

2 large tart apples, peeled, cored, sliced about 1/2-inch thick

3/4 cup apple cider

1/4 cup applejack or apple brandy

3 tablespoons whipping cream

Season the chops with 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. Heat the fat in a skillet over medium-high heat; add the chops. Cook, turning once, to brown both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer chops to a plate; keep warm.

Add the onion; cook, sprinkled with a little salt, until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the apples, coating them with the fat and onions; cook, stirring often, until beginning to soften, 3 minutes. They should be cooked through but retain their shape.

Stir in the apple cider and applejack; return chops to skillet. Lower heat to medium; cook at a simmer until chops are cooked through.

Transfer chops and apples to dinner plates, leaving sauce in the skillet. Add cream to skillet; cook at a simmer until slightly reduced, 5 minutes. Pour the sauce over the chops and apples. Makes 2 servings.

Per serving: 575 calories, 35 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 103 mg cholesterol, 43 g carbohydrates, 24 g protein, 670 mg sodium, 3 g fiber.


Chicago Tribune

Pork chops and apple sauce are a familiar flavor combination, perhaps from our childhoods. I don’t know how I came to like the savory pork and naturally sweet apples together, because I don’t think my mom ever made that for us. Somehow, I picked it up, nevertheless.

If she had made it, she would have used her homemade applesauce, sourced from the tree outside the kitchen door. Well, until those apples got too wormy to use. Then she turned to the small orchard on Grandma’s farm.

Feeling nostalgic for that applesauce, if not that false memory, I paired pork and apples for dinner recently. But instead of cooking the fruit down into applesauce, I did a quicker version, merely sauteed apples.

Pumping up their flavor and creating a sauce with cider seemed like a good idea. Into that, a little applejack, the American apple brandy, for a triple apple effect. Now that I think of it, a double pork effect would work here. You could crisp up some bacon to start then …

Read more Food stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Bhindi masala: </span>Fried okra in a flavorful spice paste is a surefire way to fall in love with the misunderstood vegetable.

    YOU’RE DOING IT WRONG

    No slime: Indian dish brings out the best of okra

    I am glad that no one ever forced stewed okra on me during my childhood, because the stories I’ve heard from stewed-okra veterans have been traumatizing. Friends and colleagues have described memories of okra that was sulfurous and slimy and yet left a cottony feeling on their tongues and gums. (This is no coincidence: The okra plant is related to the cotton plant.)

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Layered Tomato-Watermelon Salad</span>

    Cooking

    7 new ways to build a 7-layer salad

    From fruits to pastas, novel ideas to liven it up the next time you layer it on.

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Keeps bitterness in check: </span>Soaking radicchio in cold water helps mellow out its bite.

    Today’s Special

    Water bath takes some bite out of bitter radicchio

    These tips turn radicchio into something radical.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category