Holiday entertaining

A Christmas breakfast casserole that has it all

 
 
French toast hash crumb casserole
French toast hash crumb casserole
Matthew Mead / AP

Breakfast

French Toast Hash Crumble Casserole

9 eggs

2/3 cup half-and-half

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

8 slices sandwich bread

4 cups (about 1 pound) frozen shredded potatoes

3 large apples, peeled, cored and diced

8 ounces (2 cups) shredded cheese

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 cup rolled oats

1 cup packed brown sugar

1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened

1 tablespoon cinnamon

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, half-and-half, thyme, salt and pepper. Set aside.

Coat a deep 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Arrange 4 slices of the bread in an even layer over the bottom of the pan.

In a large bowl, toss the potatoes, apples and cheese. Spread the mixture evenly over the bread. Pour half of the egg mixture evenly over the potatoes and apples, pressing it with a fork to help it absorb. Top the potato mixture with the remaining 4 slices of bread. Pour the remaining egg mixture over the bread and press gently with a fork to help it absorb.

In the same bowl used to mix the potatoes and apples, combine the flour, oats, brown sugar, butter and cinnamon. Use your hands to mix the ingredients together until evenly blended. Spread the crumble topping evenly over the bread. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

When ready to bake, heat the oven to 375 degrees. Uncover the pan and bake for 1 hour, or until lightly browned and crisp. Makes 12 servings.

Per serving: 530 calories (47 percent from fat), 28 g fat (15 g saturated, 0.5 g trans fats), 200 mg cholesterol, 57 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 26 g sugar, 15 g protein, 350 mg sodium.


Associated Press

What you want on Christmas morning: a house that effortlessly fills itself with joyous sounds and delicious aromas. What you usually get on Christmas morning: towers of wrapping paper and a kitchen that demands way too much of your attention.

I can’t help you with the wrapping paper, but I can make your holiday breakfast a little easier. I’m a big believer that Christmas morning is meant to be spent under the tree, not at the stove. And yet I still want the house to fill itself with delicious aromas.

My solution? A do-ahead breakfast casserole that I can prep the night before, then just pop into the oven to bake. This year I created an indulgent dish that is equal parts casserole, hash browns, fruit crumble and French toast. Because…. why not? It’s Christmas.

This recipe makes plenty so it’s easy to feed a crowd. The leftovers are easily reheated. I like it served with a drizzle of maple syrup. If you’d rather take this in a savory direction, add chopped ham when combining the potatoes and cheese.

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