Tea party favorite challenges Cornyn in last-minute 2014 filing

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

In a last minute surprise move, Rep. Steve Stockman, R-Texas, filed a challenge to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, just minutes before Monday's deadline for Texas' 2014 federal elections.

Stockman, a conservative favorite of the tea party, was elected last year after having served one term in the mid-1990s. Cornyn, the Senate minority whip, is running for his third term. He has been fending off criticism from the right, especially after failing to back Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in his moves to force a showdown over Obamacare and the federal budget. Cruz, a tea party star who won the seat in his first run for elective office, has refused to endorse Cornyn. It is not clear if he will support Stockman, who joined six other GOP challengers to Cornyn for the March 4 primary. Cruz is in South Africa for the memorial service for iconic apartheid fighter Nelson Mandela.

Cornyn campaign manager Brendan Steinhauser said in a statement that "Sen. Cornyn looks forward to discussing his conservative record with Texans." Stockman made waves earlier this year by inviting rocker Ted Nugent, an outspoken gun advocate, to the State of the Union address, where many Newtown, Conn. families, affected by the shootings, were the marquee guests.

Cornyn has a war chest of $7 million and got a boost this morning from the conservative Club for Growth, which said it will stay out of the race. “While Congressman Stockman has a pro-economic growth record, so does Senator Cornyn, as witnessed by his 87% lifetime Club for Growth score,” said Club for Growth President Chris Chocola.

“Our PAC evaluates three factors when looking at races that involve incumbents: 1) the strength of the incumbent’s record; 2) the degree of difference between the incumbent and the challenger on economic issues; and 3) the viability of the challenger. None of those factors weigh against Senator Cornyn, so we do not expect to be involved in the Texas Senate race.”

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  • Wisconsin governor skirts touchy casino decision

    Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker portrays himself as a man of action, willing to take on tough political fights. It's a huge theme in his re-election campaign, underscored in his 2013 political memoir, "Unintimidated."

  •  
North Korean women, dressed in traditional Chogori watch a pro wrestling exhibition, Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014 in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Koreans got their first look at pro wrestling in about 20-years on Saturday when former NFL lineman Bob "The Beast" Sapp, and 20 other fighters from around the world took to the ring for an exhibition in Pyongyang, put together by colourful Japanese pro-wrestler Kanji "Antonio" Inoki, who is now a member of parliament.

    Pro wrestling returns to the ring in North Korea

    North Koreans got their first look at pro wrestling in about 20 years on Saturday when an ex-NFL lineman and 20 other grapplers from around the world took to the ring for an exhibition put together by a charismatic former Japanese pro-wrestler who is now a member of parliament.

  • Health law factors into governor's, Senate races

    Democrats Mark Pryor and Mike Ross took different positions on the president's federal health overhaul plan when it came before Congress four years ago. But, running in the two hottest races in Arkansas this fall, both find themselves under attack on the issue and navigating around it as they struggle to prevent a complete Republican takeover of the state's top offices.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category