Dear Abby

Dear Abby: Stuffing or dressing: What’s the difference?

 
 
abby
abby

Dear Abby: My husband and I have the same argument

every year around Thanksgiving. He says there is a

difference between stuffing and dressing. I say they're the

same thing, except that stuffing is baked in the turkey,

while dressing is baked separately in a casserole dish.

My husband insists I'm wrong —that the difference

has nothing to do with how it's cooked. He thinks stuffing

is made with regular bread, while dressing is made with cornbread.

The debate is driving me crazy. Will you please tell

me who is right?

Stuffing vs. Dressing in Ohio

The terms "dressing"

and "stuffing" are interchangeable. They refer to a

seasoned mixture used to stuff meat or poultry. It makes no

difference what kind of bread is used.

Some tips: If you plan to stuff your turkey, be sure

all the ingredients are -cooked (i.e. vegetables, fruit,

meat, seafood). Using pasteurized liquid eggs is safer than

using raw eggs. The bird should be loosely stuffed, not

packed because stuffing expands while cooking, and the

turkey should be stuffed right before it is put into the

oven, never ahead of time.

The stuffing takes the longest of the bird's

components to reach the desired safe temperature (165

degrees). Once the stuffing is in the turkey, it should not

be removed until the turkey is ready to be carved.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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