Haiti's abortion crisis

  • Marie, 20, arrived at MSF's emergency obsterics center in Delmas suffering from a perforated uterus, excessive bleeding and loss of fluids following an abortion performed by a non-licensed doctor known as a "charlatan." She spent two months hospitalized during which another woman, also suffering from post-abortion complications, died. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A Haitian girl shows Cytotec, a pill sold on the street and in pharmacies that is used to induce abortions. The drug is widely available for sale without a prescription. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A student from Lycee de Jeune Fille, a girls' secondary school in Port-au-Prince, walks past a street mural by politically-astute graffiti artist Jerry Rosembert that depicts a suppressed Haitian woman. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A man who claims to be a medical doctor with a degree from the State University of Haiti displays almost 300 case files for abortions performed during the month of September 2013 in his tiny office in downtown Port-au-Prince. He compared doing abortions to cocaine, saying the money was so good it's difficult to stop. He charges $80 for the procedure. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • New mom Stephanie Simeon is comforted after giving birth to her baby boy Christopher at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Yvonne Geffrard sells herbs and home treatments in the market in downtown Port-au-Prince. She's holding some of the 18 herbs some women seek out to make a concoction that many women believe induces abortions. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jocelyne 17, from a rural town outside of Haiti's capital says she has been repeatedly raped by a relative's husband. The first time, she became pregnant at age 16 and she aborted the fetus using misoprostol (Cytotec), a pill readily available in Haiti without a prescription. After the man attacked her three more times and she became pregnant, she decided to keep the baby as "a cry for help," hoping that people would start to believe her and the man would leave her alone. She is 14 weeks pregnant in this photo. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Street vendor Laurent Delva sells Cytotec on the streets near Haiti's main public hospital for the equivalent of $2.50. The pill is commonly used by women seeking to terminate their pregnancies, and is widely available for sale on the street and in pharmacies without a prescription. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Stephanie Simeon endures labor as midwife Farah Pierre helps deliver Simeon's new baby at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Dr. Rodnie Senat-Delva, Ob//Gyn, coaches new mom Phildor Marie Micka as she delivers a baby with the assistance of midwife Marie Jean Jacque at MSF's emergency obsterics center in Delmas, Haiti where Dr. Senta-Delva is medical director. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Midwife Mariame Ovedrago proudly shows off a newborn she delivered as two other midwives help another woman give birth at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. In January, Haiti plans to launch a national family planning campaign. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Dr. Antonio Jean Baptiste checks on a new mom in the maternal cholera unit while on rounds at MSF's emergency obsterics center in Delmas, Haiti. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A female patient has her blood pressure checked in the maternal cholera unit at MSF's emergency obsterics center in Delmas, Haiti. For every 100,000 babies born in Haiti, 630 women die from pregnancy-related causes, including abortion, according to the latest natioanl statistics from the health ministry. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Rose Ojae, 18 months, center, joins other children and mothers seeking family planning assistance at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. In January, Haiti plans to launch a national family planning campaign. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Rose Ojae, 18 months, center, joins other children and mothers seeking family planning assistance at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. In January, Haiti plans to launch a national family planning campaign. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • New mothers await family planning counseling at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. In January, Haiti plans to launch a national family planning campaign. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Michaella Noijuste, 18 months old, sticks closely to her mother, Berna Louis, as the young mother seeks family planning services at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. Louis, who was at the clinic seeking birth control advice, is part of a changing dynamic of Haitian women taking control of their own bodies. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Dr. Pierre-Donald Vilmency says he does not perform abortions, but he does treat women who come to him with complications from incomplete abortions in his office in a suburb of Port-au-Prince. Abortions that are self-induced or performed by non-medical personnel have become more prevalent in Haiti where the procedure is illegal. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Julianne Joseph, 32, a street vendor who sells herbs and home remedies, markets her goods in Port-au-Prince. She's holding citronella that she says is dangerous and toxic to pregnant women. Unsafe abortions that are self-induced or performed by non-medical personnel, have become more prevalent in Haiti, where the practice is illegal. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A young girl plays outside a typical pharmacy in downtown Port-au-Prince, where Cytotec is readily available without prescription for women seeking to induce abortions. Unsafe abortions that are self-induced or performed by non-medical personnel, have become more prevalent in Haiti, where the practice is illegal.. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Shaded from the fierce Haitian sun by an umbrella, Michaella Noijuste, 18 months old, and her mother, Berna Louis, leave a family planning session at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. Louis, who was at the clinic seeking birth control advice, is part of a changing dynamic of Haitian women taking control of their own bodies. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Juvukha Laguerre, 16, says she hasn't considered birth control. She is getting a check up at a healthcare facility at Petite Place Cazeau that is funded by UNFPA and the Haitian government. In January, Haiti plans to launch a national family planning campaign. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF