Norway: Rjukan sees winter sun for first time

 
AFP / AFP/Getty Images

Residents of the small Norwegian town of Rjukan have finally seen the light. Tucked in between steep mountains, the town is normally shrouded in constant shadow for almost six months a year. But last month, faint rays from the winter sun for the first time reached the town’s market square, thanks to three 183-square-foot mirrors placed atop the nearby mountain. The plan to illuminate Rjukan was cooked up 100 years ago by Norwegian industrialist Sam Eyde, who built the town to provide workers for a hydroelectric plant he built at the foot of a nearby waterfall. The idea was revived in 2005 by Martin Andersen, an artist and resident of the town, who helped raise the sponsorship money.

Associated Press

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