Research

Less is more when it comes to yelling at teenagers

 
 
300 dpi 3 col x 12.5 in / 146x318 mm / 497x1080 pixels Randy Mack Bishop color illustration of a screaming mouth. The Dallas Morning News 2005

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KEYWORDS: krthalloween halloween scream screaming mouth scary sight scared scare frighten frightened fear eye halloween terror terrified krtfeatures features krtnational national krtworld world counseling krthealth health krtmentalhealth mental health therapy krt boca chillido grito espantar asustar susto sobresaltar miedo aspecto aspectos illustration ilustracion grabado da contributor coddington  phobia fright bishop yelling 2005 krt2005
300 dpi 3 col x 12.5 in / 146x318 mm / 497x1080 pixels Randy Mack Bishop color illustration of a screaming mouth. The Dallas Morning News 2005

KEYWORDS: krthalloween halloween scream screaming mouth scary sight scared scare frighten frightened fear eye halloween terror terrified krtfeatures features krtnational national krtworld world counseling krthealth health krtmentalhealth mental health therapy krt boca chillido grito espantar asustar susto sobresaltar miedo aspecto aspectos illustration ilustracion grabado da contributor coddington phobia fright bishop yelling 2005 krt2005

Randy Mack Bishop / MCT

Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Teens, do you feel that the more your parents yell at you, the less good it does?

You may be right.

After monitoring nearly 1,000 families over two years, a psychology professor at the University of Pittsburgh concluded that repeatedly yelling at your kids tends to make things worse – including their behavior.

Teenagers who are subjected to screaming are apt to respond with anger that can take the form of aggression or misconduct, said Ming-Te Wang, an assistant professor who oversaw the study, in an article published in the professional journal Child Development.

The more that a parent dials up the vitriol – adding swearing, insults or name-calling – the more likely it is to backfire, Wang said.

And apologizing later with a hug might not be enough to undo the damage. Parental “warmth did not moderate the associations between mothers’ and fathers’ use of harsh verbal discipline and adolescent conduct problems,” the article says.

What are you supposed to do instead of yelling?

Try dealing with the kids with respect, and focus on educating them rather than humiliating them, the article recommends.

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