UM notebook

Top-10 Canes historic underdog against No. 3 Seminoles

 
 
University of Miami Duke Johnson (8) is tackled by Wake Forest defender Kevin Johnson (9) in the second half of an NCAA college football game at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens on Oct. 26, 2013. Miami won 24-21.
University of Miami Duke Johnson (8) is tackled by Wake Forest defender Kevin Johnson (9) in the second half of an NCAA college football game at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens on Oct. 26, 2013. Miami won 24-21.
Alan Diaz / AP

mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com

How big of an underdog are the Hurricanes on Saturday night at Florida State?

According to ESPN radio host and Las Vegas insider RJ Bell, UM is the biggest underdog in history when it comes to two undefeated teams “meeting this late in the season.” Third-ranked FSU is a 22-point favorite.

According to Bell, there have been only two other instances of a double-digit favorite when two undefeated Top 10 teams played this late in the season.

Texas was favored by 12 hosting Oklahoma State (Oct. 25, 2008) and Miami by 11 against Ohio State (2002 BCS title game). Texas won 28-24, and Ohio State prevailed 31-24 in double overtime.

“It doesn’t matter whether someone respects us or not,” UM running back Duke Johnson said.

“We don’t care. We’re here to play football and do it the way we’re being taught to.”

• With the NCAA sanctions announced and the long wait now behind UM, coach Al Golden said Tuesday conversations with recruits "are taking a different path now."

"It supports the trust factor you have with those families," Golden said. "You’re not a sitting duck. They can say whatever they want about our football program but can’t say anything about the ongoing situation, the death penalty. All those things I classified as toxic have disappeared."

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