Television

‘Good Wife’ turns corporate machinations into must-see TV

 
 
'The Good Wife': Julianna Margulies stars as Alicia Florrick.
'The Good Wife': Julianna Margulies stars as Alicia Florrick.
Justin Stephens / CBS

Philadelphia Daily News

There aren’t many TV shows that could make a corporate breakup as anxiety-inducing a viewing experience as an alien invasion or zombie apocalypse.

But as CBS’ The Good Wife makes good at 9 p.m. Sunday on the promise of its fourth-season finale, sending Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) and a bunch of disgruntled associates off to make their fortunes outside of Lockhart Gardner, things get wonderfully, nail-bitingly messy.

Because as much as Alicia would like to believe that she’s merely made a coolheaded business decision, she’s also betrayed a trust, as coolheaded businesspeople have been known to do.

And it says a lot about just how grown-up a show The Good Wife is that betraying not only her longtime friend, mentor and sometime lover Will Gardner (Josh Charles) but the people who’d recently welcomed her as a partner has been given nearly as much weight as the sexual and psychological betrayal that brought Alicia to Lockhart Gardner in the first place.

And that it’s still not stopping her from leaving, or from taking as many clients with her as she can.

As sure-footed in its fifth season as it was in its first, when Alicia was putting her life back together amid a scandal involving her politician husband Peter (Chris Noth), The Good Wife is unafraid to make Alicia as flawed — and therefore as interesting — as those who’ve occasionally done her wrong.

There are consequences, though, and anyone working in corporate America will probably feel a twinge at how quickly, and how efficiently, things get nasty.

Speaking of nasty, in Sunday’s episode, Hitting the Fan, Alicia and Peter (now the governor-elect of Illinois) have the kind of fun we haven’t seen them share in a while (and I’m not only talking about the sex).

Maybe it’s because they’re both navigating that tricky territory between the high and low roads.

Read more TV & Radio stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category