Son wins malpractice suit in dad's death

 

Sun Sentinel

A lawyer has won a medical malpractice lawsuit over the death of his father, a former prominent Broward County civic leader, after a judge ruled that hospital officials had concealed evidence in the case.

The decision eliminated the hospital's defense and forced the suit to be settled for an undisclosed amount.

"It's unfortunate that the taxpayers' money was wasted for five years in a case that should have been resolved long ago," said Robert W. Kelley of Fort Lauderdale, who sued on behalf of his father, Robert P. Kelley.

After a two-day hearing, Circuit Judge Carlos Rodriguez found Wednesday that the North Broward Hospital District, "provided intentionally misleading testimony" in the malpractice case of the elder Kelley's death.

To read more click here.

Read more Health stories from the Miami Herald

  • Cancer

    Fasting can improve chemo effects

    The history of cancer treatment includes a long list of quack diets claiming patients can eat their way back to good health, but one approach, which involves eating less and minimizing carbohydrates, appears to produce genuine benefits.

  • chew on this

    Chew on This: Spices make food flavorful, and more healthy

    Science has once again validated observation and common sense. This time it is herbs and spices going through scientific review.

  • Skin Deep

    What’s the difference between skin rejuvenation and skin resurfacing?

    Although the terms “skin rejuvenation” and “skin resurfacing” are often used interchangeably, there is a distinct difference. Rejuvenation is anything that makes the skin look better—i.e. skincare products, treatments or in-office procedures—while resurfacing refers to a treatment or procedure that physically removes the top layer of the skin. Simply put, skin resurfacing is just one way to accomplish skin rejuvenation.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category