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UNC to wear all-black uniforms against Miami Hurricanes

 
 
UNC's T.J. Thorpe (5) leaves the field following the Tar Heels' 55-31 loss to East Carolina on Saturday September 28, 2013 in Chapel Hill, N.C. East Carolina held Thorpe to 70 yards in the Tae Heels's loss.
UNC's T.J. Thorpe (5) leaves the field following the Tar Heels' 55-31 loss to East Carolina on Saturday September 28, 2013 in Chapel Hill, N.C. East Carolina held Thorpe to 70 yards in the Tae Heels's loss.
Robert Willett / rwillett@newsobserver.com
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For those who appreciate the threads football players wear, North Carolina will don all-black uniforms against Miami in a game billed in Chapel Hill as “Zero Dark Thursday.”

Will the Canes be in all white for the 7:45 p.m. kickoff?

Hurricanes assistant athletic director for communications Chris Yandle said all he knew for sure was that Miami would wear the usual white jerseys for away games.

UNC described the all-black uniform occasion in its game notes as “the first installment in the ‘Tar Pit Series,’ which will feature an alternate uniform or helmet for one game each year.

“This year’s alternate uniform color has been taken from the black tar in the Tar Heel logo.”

UNC coach Larry Fedora, who reassured fans that Carolina blue and white “will always be our traditional colors,” said it “made sense to have a black-out game this year after the success of last season’s white-out game vs. Virginia Tech.”

UNC won that game 48-34.

The Canes are eight-point favorites.

INJURY REPORT

Fullback Walter Tucker (lower extremity) and guard Danny Isidora (foot) are out for UNC; wide receiver Rashawn Scott (collarbone) is doubtful.

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