Curb carbon or Miami is next Atlantis

 

Last year we saw strong reminders of the deadly effects of out-of-control weather caused by runaway climate disruption: a devastating drought, raging wildfires, the hottest year on record and Super-storm Sandy. Scientists have settled the argument: Climate disruption is happening, and carbon pollution is the major contributor.

Miami-Dade in particular is at risk. More than 2.5 million people live close to sea level on porous limestone. Rising seas and melting glaciers will flood this region in the coming decades unless we deal with this problem at the source. We need to curb carbon. There are currently no national limits on carbon pollution from power plants. Fortunately, the Environmental Protection Agency is establishing standards that would limit the amount of carbon pollution that coal plants can dump into our air.

We all need to back President Obama’s climate action plan to help to minimize the effects of climate disruption before Miami becomes the next Atlantis.

Coky Michel, Miami

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