UM notebook

UM running back Duke Johnson responds to heavy workload

 
 
University of Miami running back Duke Johnson attempts to outrun University of Florida defenders in the fourth quarter of their game at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens on Sept. 7, 2013.
University of Miami running back Duke Johnson attempts to outrun University of Florida defenders in the fourth quarter of their game at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens on Sept. 7, 2013.
Al Diaz / Staff Photo

sdegnan@MiamiHerald.com

One player who continues to impress his coaches is tailback Duke Johnson.

Despite fumbling three times the past two weeks, Johnson is proving he’s more than just an occasional big-play guy. Johnson can grind out the tough yards as well.

For the first time in Johnson’s UM career, he was given five consecutive carries in two separate drives — one after the other — last Saturday against Georgia Tech.

Johnson ran for 184 yards on 22 carries and had 325 all-purpose yards.

At one point Johnson’s tough runs, including a first down on third-and-3, set up UM’s touchdown that put the Canes up 31-23.

“I really thought he hit the holes hard,’’ coach Al Golden said. “He wasn’t really dancing until he got to the second and third levels. His yards after contact were phenomenal. Really proud of his effort and the way he lowered his pads, the way he stayed on track. …He kept cramming it in there right where it was supposed to go and not freelancing, and because of it some big ones opened up for him.

“Maybe that’s the first time in his career that it was Duke time.”

•  The Canes, who don’t play this weekend, were back on the practice field Tuesday; although access is closed this week to the media.

Read more UM stories from the Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category