A Fork on the Road

International juice bar sweetens Shorecrest

 

If you go

Place: Guarapo Organic Juice Bar

Address: 649 NE 79th St., Miami

Contact: 786-452-1622, guarapojuice.com

Hours: 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday

Prices: Juices $5-$6, smoothies $7-$8.50, shots $2, salad bar $6.99 per pound

F.Y.I. Juice cleanser packages available. Free parking; delivery available for orders of $20 and more.


Beverage

Honey Wheat Germ Smoothie

This recipe, adapted from “The Top 100 Immunity Boosters” by Charlotte Haigh (Duncan Baird, 2005), is rich in B vitamins and fiber. Substitute seasonal fruit if you wish.

1 cup almond milk

1/4 cup plain yogurt

1 cup frozen raspberries

1 ripe banana, peeled

1 generous tablespoon wheat germ

1 tablespoon honey

Place all ingredients in a blender and whirl until smooth. Makes 1 serving.


lbb75@bellsouth.net

The stretch of 79th Street just east of Biscayne Boulevard now has Guarapo, where folks congregate over cups of fresh-squeezed juice or shots of probiotic coconut kefir. Guarapo is Spanish for sugar cane, and peeled stalks are pressed into greenish-yellow juice or added to smoothies in a small space with lime green walls and a salad bar.

Health-conscious owner Edwin Delosantos, who is of Dominican and Puerto Rican descent, dissolved his graphic printing company to follow his passion and open a juice bar. His cousin Jose Martinez helps out, and his aunt provides homemade soups.

Sugar cane is a tall grass native to New Guinea, where it features in ancient creation myths. It spread to India, where it was first cultivated. Raw cane juice is rich in enzymes, vitamins and minerals, similar to wheat grass but sweeter and with less chlorophyll.

Try the Brazilian garapa (from the Tupi Amerindian word for sugar cane) that mixes cane juice with passion fruit, carrot and ginger. Ganne ka ras is the Indian version with lemon, mint and ginger, while the Egyptian aseer asab mixes in orange, pineapple and strawberries.

Air tebu is the Indonesian take with melon and carrot, and Kenyan muwa adds coconut and lime, all refreshing.

Juices range from elixirs for sore throats, allergies and acne to cleansers with kale, citrus, apples, beets and cucumber. Power smoothies include the blueberry bliss with hemp milk and almond butter and the Amazon with pineapple, papaya and coconut.

Add chia seeds, flaxseed oil or peanut butter. Or just drink your sugar with a side salad and head to yoga full of natural energy.

Linda Bladholm is a Miami food writer and personal chef who can be reached at lbb75@bellsouth.net.

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