DEATH ON FACEBOOK

Facebook messages detail fight before fatal shooting

 

ebenn@MiamiHerald.com

A deadly South Miami fight that ended with a photo of a woman’s bullet-riddled body splashed on Facebook may have started as the simplest of domestic squabbles, according to documents investigators released Tuesday.

Jennifer Alfonso’s husband and confessed killer overslept and missed a date night with her the evening before the shooting. She confronted him about it in the morning.

“We fought,” Alfonso, 26, wrote to her friend Kelly Barry in a series of Facebook messages shortly before Alfonso’s death on Aug. 8. “He doesn’t give a s---. He called me a bitch LOL…I feel like I want to leave.”

Minutes later, Derek Medina, 31, fired six to eight rounds into his wife in the kitchen of their townhome, then posted a ghastly photo of her contorted body onto his Facebook page.

“Facebook people you’ll see me in the news,” Medina wrote to his 164 Internet friends before turning himself in to police. His posts about the shooting and the photo of Alfonso remained on the social networking site for several hours, shared and viewed thousands of times worldwide before being taken down.

Surveillance footage shot inside the home that investigators released last month shows a spine-chilling swirl of gunpowder in the air from the shots that felled Alfonso, 26. Medina can be seen calmly exiting the home, leaving behind Alfonso’s 10-year-old daughter from a previous relationship. The girl was not physically harmed.

Investigators on Tuesday released a series of Facebook messages between Alfonso and Barry from the morning of the slaying.

Alfonso sent Barry a note at 2:57 a.m., “U still awake?” At 7:09 a.m., the conversation picked up.

“Dude…der [Medina] was supposed to wake us up last night,” Alfonso wrote. “To watch a movie. He promised me. … I feel like I’m begging for him to hang out with us. I already no [sic] what his excuse is going to be – that his alarm didn’t go off.”

After some back-and-forth, Alfonso thanked Barry for making her feel better.

“I felt like ripping his face off an hour ago,” Alfonso wrote.

After saying she wasn’t sure if Medina had left their home, Alfonso wrote to her friend, “He just woke up. He came in the room, and then he walked out. Didn’t say anything. … I need to calm down because I feel like I’m about to explode.”

Alfonso also wrote about her stormy relationship with Medina in diary entries that investigators released last month. She titled the journal “The mind of an insane women [sic].”

“When we love each other it’s GREAT. But when we hate each other we HATE each other,” she wrote in her diary, adding that she once wanted to “rip his eyes right out” after he ogled another woman.

Medina, who pleaded not guilty to a murder charge and is tentatively scheduled to stand trial Nov. 4, may mount a self-defense claim, arguing that Alfonso was the aggressor in their fatal argument this summer. He told police he shot Alfonso after she punched and kicked him and threatened to leave him.

Shortly after 10 a.m. on Aug. 8, Medina grabbed his .380-caliber pistol and pointed it at Alfonso as she gripped a kitchen knife, according to court documents. Medina told investigators he disarmed Alfonso, she responded with a punch, and then he shot her and posted about it on Facebook – the same social-networking site where Alfonso had been reaching out to a friend minutes earlier.

Barry sent an email to investigators a week after her friend’s killing, saying the online messages they exchanged between 7:10 and 10:14 a.m. on Aug. 8 “might be helpful to you.”

Medina, a security guard, actively used the Internet to document his life, posting scores of videos of himself on YouTube and writing self-help e-books with long-winded titles that he promoted on his site emotionalwriter.com.

He and Alfonso married in January 2010, divorced in February 2012, then remarried three months later.

“We have the strangest relationship, to me anyway,” Alfonso wrote in a diary entry last year. “We get angry at each other for the stupidest things.”

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