Senate moves toward showdown vote on Obamacare

 
 
In a break with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and tea party-aligned Senate conservatives, Republican leader Mitch McConnell announced Monday he will not vote to block legislation aimed at preventing a partial government shutdown.
In a break with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and tea party-aligned Senate conservatives, Republican leader Mitch McConnell announced Monday he will not vote to block legislation aimed at preventing a partial government shutdown.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

McClatchy Washington Bureau

The Senate is expected to take a key vote Wednesday that would smooth the path for an eventual showdown over President Barack Obama’s health care plan, but the midday vote is likely to inflame a raging war within the Republican Party.

A group of Republican senators tried to launch an old-fashioned filibuster Tuesday, despite pleas from party leadership to back off.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, spent all night leading the effort -- and he and his allies continued talking Wednesday morning. They've now engaged in the longest extended, nonstop debate in decades.

“I intend to speak in support of defunding Obamacare until I am no longer able to stand,” said Cruz when he kicked off the debate Tuesday afternoon. Behind him was an army of Senate allies and grass-roots conservatives, defying Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and other top Republicans who want to limit debate. They figure the Democratic-run Senate will never agree to strip the health care money.

Fight anyway, said conservative interest groups. “This is the ultimate betrayal,” the Senate Conservatives Fund said of the Senate’s top two Republicans, McConnell and John Cornyn of Texas. The Club for Growth said it would include the debate vote on its 2014 congressional scorecard.

The Senate is considering legislation that the Republican-led House of Representatives passed Friday. It would keep the government running through Dec. 15 while defunding Obamacare.

McConnell countered that the bill is what he and other Republicans want, so why delay? “We’d all be hard-pressed to explain why we were opposed to a bill we were in favor of,” he said.

Cruz’s backers argued that Democrats will put the funding back in eventually, a point reiterated by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. “I want to be very, very clear again: The Senate will not pass any bill that defunds or delays Obamacare,” he said Tuesday after a meeting with Senate Democrats.

If some agreement on funding isn’t reached by Oct. 1, when the new fiscal year begins, parts of the government will begin shutting down. Essential services and operations, such as national security, would continue.

Few on either side of the debate say they want a shutdown, aware that it’s highly unpopular with the public.

“I just don’t happen to think filibustering a bill that defunds Obamacare is the best route to defunding Obamacare,” McConnell said. “All it does is shut down the government and keep Obamacare funded. And none of us want that.”

But he’s unable to quell an influential chunk of his caucus. Senate Republicans met privately Tuesday, and many urged Cruz to drop his delaying tactics. Cruz, a potential 2016 presidential contender, would not.

“I told my wife I now pick up the newspapers each day to learn what a scoundrel I am, and just what attack will come,” he said. It’s time, Cruz said, that lawmakers listen to their constituents, and they don’t like the new health care law and feel increasingly alienated.

“We just had a six-week recess during August, where a substantial percentage of members of Congress chose not to hold town halls,” Cruz said. “Not even to give constituents a chance to say their views.”

Republicans pressured by the staunch conservatives are fighting back. Let vulnerable Democratic senators oppose defunding, they say, and then “the question ought to be why can’t red state Democrats listen to their own constituents,” Cornyn said.

McConnell, like many incumbent Republicans likely to vote to cut off debate, faces enormous pressure as he seeks re-election next year. Businessman Matt Bevin, who’s challenging McConnell for the Republican Senate nomination in Kentucky, was quick to side with Cruz.

“There is really no difference between Mitch McConnell and Alison Grimes: Both would vote on the side of Harry Reid,” Bevin said, referring to Democratic Senate candidate Grimes. “I am proud to support conservatives like Sen. Ted Cruz in his fight to defund Obamacare, and I promise the people of Kentucky: I will never cave to Harry Reid.”

Wednesday’s vote is likely to be the first in a series that could last for days. Sixty Senate votes are needed to limit debate, and supporters of a cutoff are expected to have far more than that.

Assuming they succeed, other procedural maneuvers might require more such votes later this week, and if the conservatives use all their weapons, a final vote on legislation is unlikely until Sunday. The measure, without the Obamacare defunding, is expected to pass.

It would then go to the House, where Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, would have to decide whether to allow a vote on that bill or try to change it so that it strips out the Obamacare money. Boehner hasn’t said what he might do.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story wrongly said that the budget measure is expected to pass the Senate without the Obamacare “funding.” It should have said “defunding.”

Email: dlightman@mcclatchydc.com; Twitter: @lightmandavid

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - This Aug. 19, 2012 file photo shows actor Cory Monteith at the 2012 Do Something awards in Santa Monica, Calif.  Monteith, who shot to fame in the hit TV series "Glee" but was beset by addiction struggles so fierce that he once said he was lucky to be alive, died July 13, 2013 after an overdose of heroin and alcohol. He was 31. Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday called on first responders to use an overdose-reversal drug to help save lives amid a nationwide resurgence in heroin abuse, a public health scourge claiming the lives of celebrities and young people alike.

    Holder urges use of overdose-reversal drug

    Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday urged first responders to use an overdose-reversal drug to help save lives amid a nationwide resurgence in heroin abuse, a public health scourge claiming the lives of celebrities and young people alike.

  • Recordings surface in New Mexico governor race

    Democrats called Wednesday for Republican Gov. Susana Martinez to apologize after a liberal publication released recordings in which she and aides used profanity and offensive names to describe political opponents.

  • Cantor blasts Obama for immigration attack on GOP

    House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is criticizing President Barack Obama for attacking the same lawmakers he's supposed to be working with on immigration.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category