Miami’s Top 5: What you should know Tuesday

 
 
Miami Marlins president David Samson, right, chats with team owner Jeffrey Loria, center, and Larry Beinfest, president of baseball operations, before a game in April.
Miami Marlins president David Samson, right, chats with team owner Jeffrey Loria, center, and Larry Beinfest, president of baseball operations, before a game in April.
Wilfredo Lee / AP

1. The Miami Marlins keep losing, and now there’s talk of tension in the front office between owner Jeffrey Loria and several of his top executives. Some say that Loria is now making most of the baseball decisions.

2. The Florida State Board of Education is ready to pick a permanent successor to Education Commissioner Tony Bennett. The board, which meets Tuesday in West Palm Beach, is expected to hire interim commissioner Pam Stewart for the job instead of launching a national search.

3. Baptist Health South Florida is hosting on-site workshops for potential new citizens to mark National Citizenship day Tuesday. The company is one of about a dozen businesses in California, Florida and Washington, D.C., that are part of a pilot program to help their employees make the leap to citizenship.

4. How will garbage workers fare at County Hall? Miami-Dade commissioners on Tuesday will again consider restoring docked pay over healthcare costs. Commissioners voted once for the workers, but Mayor Carlos Gimenez vetoed the commission’s decision, setting the stage for this showdown.

5. Don’t expect to see much sun Tuesday. The gloom is back, as are the storms. The sun is expected to make more of an appearance later in the week.

Read more Miami-Dade stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category