Venezuelan opposition leader Henrique Capriles speaks in Miami, Doral

 
 
Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado presents  Henrique Capriles, Venenzuelan opposition leader (center) a key to the city of Miami, as Miami Dade College President Eduardo Padron looks on.
Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado presents Henrique Capriles, Venenzuelan opposition leader (center) a key to the city of Miami, as Miami Dade College President Eduardo Padron looks on.
City of Miami

Venezuelan’s most famous opposition leader Henrique Capriles, on visit to South Florida, was honored Sunday morning in Doral.

Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado presented Capriles with a “Key to the City” as did Doral Mayor Luigi Boria, who is the first Venezuelan-born mayor in the United States.

Doral has the largest population of Venezuelans outside of the South American country.

Capriles is the governor of the state of Miranda in Venezuela. Capriles narrowly lost the April 14 presidential election to late President Hugo Chavez’s hand-picked successor, Nicolas Maduro.

Capriles and his supporters claim Maduro stole the election through fraud.

Regalado said the event “demonstrated the exile community’s solidarity in his fight for democracy in Venezuela.”

During a speech Sunday afternoon sponsored by Miami Dade College at the James L. Knight Center to an auditorium full of Venezuelans dressed in red, yellow and blue, the colors of the Venezuelan flag, Capriles urged thousands of his countrymen in Miami to stay continue pushing for change in the country they left behind.

Capriles vowed to continue peacefully advocating for change in Venezuela, and said he dreamed of the day all of those who have left return. He also urged them to continue pushing for the reopening of the Miami consulate closed in 2012.

Many stood in applause and called him their president.

On Monday morning, Capriles will meet with the Miami Herald/el Nuevo Herald Editorial Board.

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