Consenting adults: It’s a two-part test

 

Lately, there has been some confusion about when you need consent. In too many discussions of rape cases, people are blaming everyone but the person responsible – Miley Cyrus, say, or the “culture,” or the victim.

Montana District Judge G. Todd Baugh recently let off with a 30-day sentence a teacher, Stacey Dean Rambold, who raped a 14-year-old. And in the course of doing so, Baugh pointed out that the victim was “older than her chronological age” and that “it wasn’t this forcible beat-up rape.”

In apologizing for one of his lousy sentences, the judge later said that he was “not sure just what I was attempting to say, but it did not come out correct.”

Which is pretty terrible as apologies go.

I’m sure what he meant to say was, “Women are people, rape is rape, I’m going to go rethink my life and, gee, these sentencing guidelines are kind of screwy.”

Not “forcible”? That doesn’t mean there was consent.

And consent is not optional.

People need to stop treating consent as if it’s nice but not required, like holding doors open for people or carrying mints. They also need to stop treating consent as if it’s implied if you are female and ever pick up a drink.

Consent is not . . . you are a woman who left the house wearing (item of clothing that my grandmother does not own).

Consent is not . . . you seem pretty mature.

Consent is not . . . you climbed out of the bowels of a teddy bear and gyrated.

Consent is not . . . you sang along with “Blurred Lines” and giggled.

Consent is not . . . well, I didn’t have to club you and drag you back to my cave.

Consent is not . . . you are my student.

Consent is making certain that the other adult you are about to have sex with wants to have sex with you. Notice: adult. Children and most teenagers cannot consent, and they especially cannot consent if you are their teacher, an adult in a position of power over them. At that age, brains are not fully developed even if bodies are.

There are many decisions that we as a society have decided teenagers are not capable of making, even if we allow them to dictate all movies that come to theaters. The fact that a teenager feels capable of making a decision does not mean that the teenager is actually capable, as anyone who has been a teenager or wrestled car keys away from a teenager will tell you.

And if you fail to get permission, because your partner is too young to consent, or too drunk, or any other reason — this is on you.

This should go without saying. But somehow, it doesn’t.

Excerpted from Alexandra Petri’s blog at washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost

© 2013, The Washington Post.

Read more From Our Inbox stories from the Miami Herald

  • Secession, a tournament for GOP

    March’s NCAA playoffs are behind us but the madness continues.

  • Vladimir Putin’s terrific, triumphant, all good, totally awesome year

    Admit it. You wish you were Vladimir Putin right now. Enemies fear him. Allies are grateful to him. Women are drawn to him. Jimmy Fallon imitates him. Even Edward Snowden wants to be his video buddy. To paraphrase that great geopolitical analyst Alicia Keys, this guy is on fire.

  • Will Chelsea Clinton’s baby be president one day?

    Last week Chelsea Clinton announced she was pregnant, and immediately political reporters began to complain about the “Clinton dynasty.” “Can you say dynasty?” wrote the staff of the Week magazine. Those words were echoed quickly by the Wire, which answered the question of when the gestating child would be eligible for the White House. (2053, if you’re wondering.)

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category