Photo Gallery: Homestead's woes

  • Hmestead's city-owned bowling and billiards facility on U.S. 1 is dark, dank and smells of mold. The city wantd to sell it, but not for the kind of money ($500,000) it is being offered. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • The vacated bowling alley on U.S. 1. Homestead hoped to sell it for close to $2 million, to pay off the debt from buying some depressed property from its former mayor. The plan isn't working out. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • Traffic on Krome Avenue passes the vacated Seminole Theatre, until recently overseen by a friend of the mayor. Homestead has sunk millions into renovations, but would need many milions more to make it functional. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • Homestead Mayor Steve Bateman, arrested the last week of August on corruption charges. Miami Herald file

  • Donna Bateman, the suspended mayor's wife.

  • David Berrones, left, and Steve Bateman, sometimes partners. Homestead is Home blog

  • George Gretsas, HOmestead city manager R. L. Chaplin

  • Frank May, who just resigned as president of the nonprofit running the Seminole Theatre. Eye on Miami blog

  • Steve Shiver, former HOmestad mayor, former Miami-Dade County manager. Miami Herald files

  • Eric Weiss, the facilities maintenance supervisor for the city of Homestead, walks through the darkened and vacated Seminole Theatre, which has gone through millions in private and public funding, but is no closer to reopening. It has been dark since the 1970s. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • Traffic on Krome avenue passes the vacated Seminole Theatre, with its marquee lit. The outside has been upgraded but the inside is gutted. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • Homestead planned to sell this shuttered bowling alley for $2 million, to pay off the debt incurred when the city bought a former mayor's depressed acreage in 2006. But offers for the alley have been lower than expected. One bid came from the former mayor sold the city the property. He offered just $500,000 PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • The dark, dank and moldy bowling alley that Homestead owns on U.S. 1. It's still equipped with bowling balls, shoes and arcade games. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • Eric Weiss, Facilities Maintenance Supervisor for the City of Homestead, gets a look at a couple of rusted movie projectors at the vacated Seminole Theatre. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • A couple of homeless people shelter themselves in a doorway of the vacated bowling alley on U.S. 1. The city hoped to get $2 million for the complex. Offers have been coming in as low as $500,000. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD

  • A freestanding convenience store sits alongside some vacant property which is a contributer to the general weathered look of Homestead's downtown PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD