TELEVISION

Fans pay big for 'Burn Notice' relics

 
 
Will Malaga, with the J. Sugarman Auction Corp., looks through the collection of Sam Axe's XL Hawaiian shirts that will be part of the 'Burn Notice' online auction.
Will Malaga, with the J. Sugarman Auction Corp., looks through the collection of Sam Axe's XL Hawaiian shirts that will be part of the 'Burn Notice' online auction.
EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

On Wednesday, someone paid $625 to eat yogurt like Michael Westen did.

An online prop auction by Burn Notice brought some high bids for mundane objects made notable by their role in the Miami-based spy series. That included the $625 winning bid for spoons and custom-made yogurt containers (with a fictional brand, Brenner’s) that made up Westen’s signature snacking habit. Played by Jeffrey Donovan, the fit ex-spy often reached for a yogurt inside his dingy loft apartment by the Miami River, his residences for seven seasons on the popular USA Network show.

The cable series airs its final episode next month, and producers held an auction this week to liquidate its props, wardrobe and sets. Most of the fan souvenirs were auctioned off online Wednesday by the J. Sugarman Auction Corp. in Hallandale. Among the notable items: a batch of six trademark Hawaiian shirts worn by slacker operative Sam Axe went for $675, a stunt version of Westen’s 1973 Dodge Charger sold for $4,000, and a Zippo lighter used by Westen’s chain-smoking mother, played by Sharon Gless, commanded a winning bid of $300.

Fictional documents created by the prop department brought fierce bidding wars. The CIA case file that led to Westen’s dismissal from the agency — a dossier of pretend papers that made up his actual “burn notice” — sold for $1,500.

DOUGLAS HANKS

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