What’s new

Cordless screwdriver has lots of bits

 

Akron Beacon Journal

SKIL’s NEW 360 Quick Select cordless screwdriver keeps a selection of bits at your fingertips.

The screwdriver has a rotating magazine that stores 12 of the most common drill bits, making the tool look a little like a revolver. The bit window is illuminated to make selection easier, and the tool also has a built-in LED light to illuminate the work surface.

The 360 Quick Select is only about the size of a glue gun and comes with a wall charger and a USB cable.

The screwdriver has a suggested retail price of $49.99 and is available at some Lowe’s, Home Depot and Sears stores. It can also be ordered on the Lowe’s and Home Depot websites and on Amazon.com.

ON THE SHELF

Lee Mothes has such fond memories of building a childhood clubhouse that he wants other kids to have the same experience. So he’s sharing his know-how in Keep Out! Build Your Own Backyard Clubhouse (Storey Publishing, $18.95 in softcover).

The book is a how-to guide that young people and adults alike can use to build a backyard getaway. He teaches basic construction techniques such as pounding nails and sawing boards, describes helpful tools and walks readers through all the steps involved in design and construction.

Mothes encourages kids to be creative, scrounge for materials and build their clubhouses themselves, maybe with a little help from an adult. But he also includes more complex instructions for a grown-up getaway that could be used for such purposes as a guest cottage, a studio or a potting shed.

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