The movie scene

Mads Mikkelsen on the hunt for good roles

 
 
Mikkelsen
Mikkelsen
NBC / Robert Trachtenberg/NBC

It’s hard to put a frame around Mads Mikkelsen. The tall, saturnine Danish star was the bad guy in Casino Royale and a courageous World War II resistance fighter in Flame & Citron. He’s just completed his first season as the suave, omnivorous Dr. Lecter in NBC’s “Hannibal.”

In The Hunt, which opens Friday, he plays a kindhearted schoolteacher wrongfully accused of a terrible crime. His performance in the psychological thriller won him the best actor prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. He’s even been knighted by the Queen of Denmark. But he still recalls being jeered at the curtain call the first time he played Romeo.

“One night I remember we had more than 20 people booing in the back row. It wasn’t that rare, and it wasn’t a nice feeling,” Mikkelsen said by phone from New York City. “Luckily, I was coming in for my bow joined up with Juliet, so I could always blame her.”

A gymnast and dancer before he became an actor, Mikkelsen “realized I was more in love with drama. I got my eyes opened by everything Scorsese had done, the whole period of the ’70s and ’80s in American movies,” he said. Taxi Driver was a revelation.

“It was the first film where I had this mixed emotion when I watched it. DeNiro, I didn’t like him, then I liked him, then I didn’t like him, then I liked him again. It was throwing up questions to me. I had to be active and think about what I saw instead of just giving me the answers. . . . It was a fantastic way of giving me a dilemma as an audience.” That paradox shaped his approach to acting ever afterward, he said.

“I’ve tried to achieve that in my work. It has to be a dualism, not just black or white. We can’t always do it but we can give it a try if the film’s well enough written.” His ability to shift between roles has given him the chance to build a remarkably diverse resume. In 2009, he had back-to-back roles as a mute, head-chopping Viking berserker in Valhalla Rising and a sexy, intellectual composer in Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky.

In The Hunt, a false accusation spreads rumors, suspicion and fury among the inhabitants of a small Danish town. Mikkelsen’s character, Lucas, expects that logic will prevail, but his friends turn against him and seething rancor turns a postcard-pretty village into a 21st-century Salem.

“Lucas is almost a pure victim,” Mikkelsen said. “Being the stubborn man he is, he insists on dealing with this matter in a civilized way. That’s a battle he’s bound to lose because he’s up against emotions. He’s trying to keep his sanity when people are losing theirs all around him. Funnily enough, the biggest relief in the film, for me and also for the audience, is when he loses his manners and head-butts a guy in the supermarket.”

Mikkelsen sees a parallel between the story and the tension between defending society and giving up the freedoms that make it worth preserving.

“In our paranoia and our eagerness to fight terrorism and keep democracy, we’re moving democracy to fight terror. We’re losing the battle if we’re giving in to the fear.”

Colin Covert

Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

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