Africans, Europeans most approving of U.S. drone strikes

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

The Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes project released a survey Thursday showing respondents in African and European countries are more likely to approve of U.S. drone strikes in countries such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. Middle Eastern countries had the lowest approval for strikes.

In a majority of the countries -- 31 of 39 -- more than half of respondents disapproved of the strikes. But most countries saw little change in the percent approving of the strikes, compared to a similar survey conducted last spring. Italy and France saw the largest gains in approval for drones, each jumping eight points from a year ago, while support in Britain and Tunisia dropped the most.

Israelis, Americans and Kenyans were the only countries surveyed with more than 50 percent approval for the attacks. Pakistan -- which has had more drone strikes than any other country in the world -- had the least support, with three percent of respondents approving of U.S. drone attacks.

100% find the U.S. favorable
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
Source: Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project
Graphic: Danny Dougherty

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