Dinner in minutes

Mangoes two ways flavor pork tenderloin

 
 
This is Pork Scaloppini with Rum-Mango Sauce and Coconut Rice. This is for dinner in minutes columns for Linda Gassenheimer. This was shot Wednesday, June12th, 2013.
This is Pork Scaloppini with Rum-Mango Sauce and Coconut Rice. This is for dinner in minutes columns for Linda Gassenheimer. This was shot Wednesday, June12th, 2013.
Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald staff

Main dish

PORK SCALOPPINI WITH RUM- MANGO SAUCE

2 medium-sized ripe mangoes (to yield 1cup pureed and 1 cup cubed)

3 tablespoons dark rum

3/4 pound pork tenderloin

Vegetable oil spray

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Slice 1 mango in half around the pit. Scoop out pulp with a spoon and puree in a food processor or blender. Add rum and process a few seconds. Set aside. Cube the other mango (See method.)

Remove visible fat from the pork and cut into 1-inch-thick slices. Place pork between two pieces of plastic wrap. Flatten slices to about 1/2-inch thick with the palm of your hand or use a meat bat.

Heat a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and spray with vegetable oil spray. Brown pork for 1 minute on each side. Season each cooked side with salt and pepper to taste. Reduce heat and cook pork another 2 minutes to cook through. A meat thermometer should read 145 degrees. Remove to a plate and add mango puree to pan. Cook puree for about 30 seconds, scraping up brown bits of pork as it cooks. Add the mango cubes. Toss cubes in puree for another 15-20 seconds. Spoon sauce over pork. Makes 2 servings.

Per serving: 345 calories (17 percent from fat), 6.5 g fat (1.7 g saturated, 3.1 g monounsaturated), 108 mg cholesterol, 37.0 g protein, 25.3 g carbohydrates, 2.6 g fiber, 95 mg sodium.


SIDE DISH

COCONUT RICE

1 package microwaveable brown rice to make 1 1/2 cups cooked rice

1/2 cup lite coconut milk

1 cup frozen petite peas, defrosted

Salt and freshly ground pepper

\

Cook rice according to package instructions. Measure 1 1/2 cups and set aside the remaining rice for another dinner. Add the coconut milk, peas and salt and pepper to taste. Makes 2 servings.

Per serving: 269 calories (21 percent from fat), 6.2 g fat (2.3 g saturated, 0.8 g monounsaturated), no cholesterol, 8.3 g protein, 41.4 g carbohydrates, 4.5 g fiber, 107 mg sodium.


Sweet, juicy Florida mangoes are at the peak of their season. In this dinner, I use them to make a quick, rum-flavored sauce for pork scaloppini.

Simply buy a pork tenderloin and cut into one-inch-thick slices and flatten to 1/2 inch thick. Serve the pork with a coconut-flavored rice to complete the meal. Make the rice first and set aside. The coconut milk with be absorbed by the rice.

The mango sauce calls for two mangoes, one pureed and one cubed. Here’s a quick method for cutting mango cubes: Slice off each side of the mango as close to the seed as possible. Take the mango half in your hand, skin side down. Score the fruit in a crisscross pattern through to the skin. Bend the skin backward so the cubes pop up. Slice the cubes away from the skin. Score and slice any fruit left on the pit.

Quick tip: It takes a few extra minutes to prepare the fresh mangoes. Some markets carry frozen mango pulp, which also works well in this recipe.

This meal contains 614 calories per serving with 19 percent of calories from fat.

Helpful Hints: Boneless skinless pork chops can be used instead of pork tenderloin. They are ready when a meat thermometer reads 145 degrees.

Lite coconut milk can be found in the ethnic section of the supermarket.

Light rum can be used instead of dark rum.

Countdown:

Make coconut rice.

Prepare mangoes and pork.

Make pork and sauce.

Fred Tasker’s wine suggestion: This dish, with the sweetness of mangoes and coconut milk, would go nicely with a rich, white gewürztraminer.

SHOPPING LIST

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for tonight’s Dinner in Minutes.

To buy: 2 medium-sized ripe mangoes, 1 small bottle dark rum, 3/4 pound pork tenderloin, 1 package microwaveable brown rice, 1 can lite coconut milk and 1 package frozen petite peas

Staples: Vegetable oil spray, salt and black peppercorns.

Linda Gassenheimer is the author, most recently, of “Fast and Flavorful: Great Diabetes Meals from Market to Table.” Her website is dinnerinminutes.com. Follow her on Twitter @lgassenheimer.

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