HUNGER STRIKE

Twenty-four force-fed captives

 

Guantánamo prison spokesmen refuse to identify the 2013 hunger strikers. But the Justice Department did notify the attorneys of captives who became so malnourished that they required military medical forced-feedings. At the height of the hunger strike, according to the prison, 46 men were eligible for tube feedings, if they did not instead chug a can or bottle of a nutritional supplement, such as Ensure.

Here, the Miami Herald identifies 24 prisoners whose health was at risk, according to Navy medical assessments, that their attorneys were told they'd been subjected to forced-feeding.

Hussain Almerfedi, 36, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. The Obama administration cleared him for release "with appropriate security measures" in January 2010. Almerfedi won a federal court unlawful detention suit on July 8, 2010, but the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit overturned the ruling nearly a year later.

Moath al Alwi, about 35, a Yemeni man whose lawyer Ramzi Kassem received notice he was injured during the April 13 raid on the communal Camp 6 that put the once showcase prison under lockdown, and treated. Kassem said Alwi was shot in the chest with rubber bullet pellets. A federal judge upheld Alwi's indefinite detention on Dec 30, 2008, denying his habeas corpus petition. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. He was among the first captives to arrive at the prison, in January 2002, and in January 2010 was classified as an "indefinite detainee."

Tariq Ba Awdah, 34, a Yemeni man whose lawyer says he's been on an uninterrupted hunger strike since February 2007. "I haven't tasted food for over six years," he wrote his lawyer, Omar Farah, in April. "The feeding tube has been introduced into my nose and snaked into my stomach thousands and thousands of times." He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

Mohammed Bawazir, 33, a Yemeni. His lawyer John Chandler says the firm went to federal court to oppose his force feeding in 2006, and failed. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

Ahmed Belbacha, 44, an Algerian man whom the Obama administration disclosed last year has been cleared for release. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.

Jalal Bin Amer, 40, a Yemeni man whom the Obama administration disclosed last year has been cleared for release. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.

Jihad Diyab, 41, a Syrian man whom the Obama administration disclosed last year has been cleared for release. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.

Mohammed Ghanem, in his late 30s, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court and and is classified as an "indefinite detainee." He was among the first captives to arrive at the prison, in January 2002. His attorney, Michael Rapkin, says he has been force-fed since at least May 22.

Nabil Hadjarab, 33, an Algerian man whom the Obama administration disclosed last year has been cleared for release. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.

Mohammed al-Hamiri, in his 30s, a Yemeni man whom the Obama administration disclosed last year has been cleared for release. He has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.

Mohammed Haydar, about 35, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

Zahir Hamdoun, 33, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court.In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found. His attorney, John Chandler, said he was previously a long-term hunger strike who was force fed for more than a year since 2006.

Abdulsalam al-Hela, 45, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court and is held as an "indefinite detainee."

Yasin Ismael, in his 30s, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee."

Fayez al Kandari, 35, a Kuwaiti man who for a time was considered for prosecution by military commission. A federal judge upheld Kandari's indefinite detention on Sept. 15, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee."

Hayil al-Mithali, 36, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee."

Samir Mukbel, in his 30s, a Yemeni man whose attorney helped him tell his story in a column published in The New York Times in April. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found. He was among the first captives to arrive at the prison, in January 2002.

Abdulatif Nasir, 48, a Moroccan man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee."

Fawzi al Odah, 36, a Kuwaiti man who has no lawyer but whose father Khalid said his son told him via a Red Cross video teleconference on May 21 that he was being force fed twice daily. Defense lawyers say other detainees have confirmed this as well, although without a lawyer of record the Justice Department has not sent notification. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Aug. 23, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee."

Mohammed al Qahtani, 37, a Saudi man who was subjected to such cruel "enhanced interrogation techniques" at Guantánamo that a senior Pentagon official decided in May 2008 he was tortured in U.S. custody, and ineligible for trial in the Sept. 11 plot. He looked gaunt at a June meeting, according to his attorney Ramzi Kassem, and described being taken to forced-feedings by a six-soldier anti-riot squad and painfully shackled into a restraint chair in "basically a stress position." He's been at the Guantánamo prison since February 2002, according to leaked military documents. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

Abdul Rahman Shalabi, 35, a Saudi man who was already on a hunger strike before the latest protests and has reportedly been largely tube fed since 2005. He is considered the prison's longest continuous hunger strike. Shalabi has never been charged with a crime. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee." He was among the first captives to arrive at the Guantánamo prison, in January 2002.

Suhail Abdo Anam Shorabi, about 35, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court, although in January 2010 a federal task force considered him a possible candidate for prosecution.

Uthman Abdul Rahim Mohammed Uthman, 32, a Yemeni man who won his habeas corpus lawsuit on Feb. 24, 2010 but lost after the U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, which overturned the release order on March 29, 2011. He has never been charged with a crime. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee" but said his status should be reviewed before Guantánamo detainees were transferred to the United States. He was among the first captives to arrive at the prison, in January 2002.

Abdel Malik Abdel Wahab al Rahabi, about 43, a Yemeni man who has never been charged with a crime at Guantánamo's war court. In January 2010, a federal task force designated him as an "indefinite detainee." In March, according to his lawyer David Remes, Wahab, who last saw his daughter as an infant, vowed to fast until he got out of the prison "either dead or alive."

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