On the shelf

New kitchen products for summer

 

Chicago Tribune

Get a grip on hot stuff (up to 482 degrees) with these Kitchen Gloves from Trudeau. They’re heat- and flame-resistant, so are good for prolonged handling of hot items. Silicone patterning improves the grip, flexible fabric enhances dexterity, and the size provides wrist and forearm protection. But they’re not waterproof, so don’t use when wet. For grill cooking or kitchen tasks (say, draining bacon grease from a hefty iron skillet or removing heavy pans from the oven), we found them easier to work with than kitchen mitts. A set of two is $39.99 at shoptrudeau.com.

FIRE COOKING

M ichael Chiarello’s Live Fire: 125 Recipes for Cooking Outdoors (Chronicle Books, $35) is a big, muscular book. And chef/TV celeb/Napa restaurateur Chiarello fills the pages with big, muscular images and recipes (including how to roast a whole lamb, make a 3-pound beef burger for six on country bread and prepare Italian cowboy steaks). Not all recipes are, well, so muscular, but many are seasoned with his Italian roots. Chiarello is a thorough coach, taking cooks beyond the grill and rotisserie to hearth, plancha, fire-pit and hot-box cooking. At amazon.com.

SUMMER SIP

Keep your cool — and your coolers cold — with help from a Mason Tumbler from Aladdin. The 20-ounce insulated blue-tinted mug works well with lemonade, smoothies or something more potent (we’re thinking strawberry margaritas). It features a metal lid, no BPA, a no-sweat exterior and a smoothie-friendly straw. To help make the season’s livin’ easy, it’s also dishwasher safe. The suggested retailer price: $12.99. At retailers nationwide or at aladdin-pmi.com.

Read more Food stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Spices galore: </span>Chipotle carrot soup topped with cumin roasted chickpeas.

    Cooking

    Spices of life: Seasonings every home cook should have in their pantry

    From adobo to za’atar, 26 spices to lively up your every meal. Plus: Where to find them.

  • Shopper’s Dictionary

    Hot sauce to try: Piri Piri

    What is it? Swahili for pepper pepper, piri piri is a small, bright-red, very hot bird’s eye chile that originated in Portugal before being spread to parts of Africa, South Africa and India. Also spelled pili pili or peri peri, the pepper is most commonly found in a hot sauce that includes garlic, lemon juice, paprika and other spices. It is fantastic slathered on roasted chicken and grilled fish.

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">Try it at home: </span>The roasted carrots and avocado from Huckleberry restaurant in California can now be made in your kitchen.

    Culinary SOS

    Restaurant recipe: Roasted carrots with avocado

    Dear SOS: Ever since trying the roasted carrots and avocado from Huckleberry Bakery and Café in Santa Monica, California, I can’t stop thinking about them. They taste more like French fries, even though they are just roasted carrots. I’m dying for the recipe. Any help here would be greatly appreciated.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category